Monthly Archives: July 2010

Don't try too hard

People who are told a story is controversial remember it better than those who are told it is fact. I chalk this up to my belief that “Uncertainty challenges the mind.” This delightful article from the July 2010 Scientific American Mind goes one further: too much obedience to task stunts breadth of vision.

The Willpower Paradox

Setting your mind on a goal may be counterproductive. Instead think of the future as an open question
By Wray Herbert

Psychologist Ibrahim Senay of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign figured out an intriguing way to create a laboratory version of both willfulness and willingness—and to explore possible connections to intention, motivation and goal-directed actions.

The difference is subtle, but the former were basically putting their mind into wondering mode, while the latter were asserting themselves and their will. It is the difference between “Will I do this?” and “I will do this.”

The results were provocative. People with wondering minds completed significantly more anagrams than did those with willful minds. In other words, the people who kept their minds open were more goal-directed and more motivated than those who declared their objective to themselves.

These findings are counterintuitive. Think about it. Why would asserting one’s intentions undermine rather than advance a stated goal? Perhaps, Senay hypothesized, it is because questions by their nature speak to possibility and freedom of choice. Meditating on them might enhance feelings of autonomy and intrinsic motivation, creating a mind-set that promotes success.

In this study, he recruited volunteers on the pretense that they were needed for a handwriting study. Some wrote the words “I will” over and over; others wrote “Will I?” After priming the volunteers with this fake handwriting task, Senay had them work on the anagrams. And just as before, the determined volunteers performed worse than the open-minded ones.

…those who were asserting their willpower were in effect closing their minds and narrowing their view of their future. Those who were questioning and wondering were open-minded—and therefore willing to see new possibilities for the days ahead.

Perhaps I should be saying that “Freedom engages the mind.”

Don't try too hard

People who are told a story is controversial remember it better than those who are told it is fact. I chalk this up to my belief that “Uncertainty challenges the mind.” This delightful article from the July 2010 Scientific American Mind goes one further: too much obedience to task stunts breadth of vision.

The Willpower Paradox

Setting your mind on a goal may be counterproductive. Instead think of the future as an open question
By Wray Herbert

Psychologist Ibrahim Senay of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign figured out an intriguing way to create a laboratory version of both willfulness and willingness—and to explore possible connections to intention, motivation and goal-directed actions.

The difference is subtle, but the former were basically putting their mind into wondering mode, while the latter were asserting themselves and their will. It is the difference between “Will I do this?” and “I will do this.”

The results were provocative. People with wondering minds completed significantly more anagrams than did those with willful minds. In other words, the people who kept their minds open were more goal-directed and more motivated than those who declared their objective to themselves.

These findings are counterintuitive. Think about it. Why would asserting one’s intentions undermine rather than advance a stated goal? Perhaps, Senay hypothesized, it is because questions by their nature speak to possibility and freedom of choice. Meditating on them might enhance feelings of autonomy and intrinsic motivation, creating a mind-set that promotes success.

In this study, he recruited volunteers on the pretense that they were needed for a handwriting study. Some wrote the words “I will” over and over; others wrote “Will I?” After priming the volunteers with this fake handwriting task, Senay had them work on the anagrams. And just as before, the determined volunteers performed worse than the open-minded ones.

…those who were asserting their willpower were in effect closing their minds and narrowing their view of their future. Those who were questioning and wondering were open-minded—and therefore willing to see new possibilities for the days ahead.

Perhaps I should be saying that “Freedom engages the mind.”

July 2010 Best of Informal Learning Flow

Best of Informal Learning Flow

July 1, 2010 to July 30, 2010

A few minutes ago, we inadvertently posted June’s articles by mistake. My goof. Please overlook it. Here’s the right stuff.

Featured Sources

The following are the top items from featured sources based on social signals.

  1. 10 Reasons to Stop Apologizing for Your Online Life– HarvardBusiness.org, July 15, 2010
  2. “Millions” Of Home Routers Vulnerable To Web Hack– Forbes.com: News , July 13, 2010
  3. The next wave of programming languages– OReilly Radar, July 6, 2010
  4. The Willpower Paradox– Scientific American, July 26, 2010
  5. How To Find Images You Can Use Legally– Workplace Learning Today, July 9, 2010
  6. Misfit Entrepreneurs– HarvardBusiness.org, July 20, 2010
  7. What The Knicks Just Told LeBron: Come To New York And Make $1 Billion– Forbes.com: News , July 1, 2010
  8. Where Facebook’s half a billion users reside– OReilly Radar, July 21, 2010
  9. How the Old Spice Videos Are Being Made– ReadWriteWeb, July 14, 2010
  10. How Social Media Drives New Business: Six Case Studies– TechCrunch, July 17, 2010
  11. Social Media’s Critical Path: Relevance to Resonance to Significance– HarvardBusiness.org, July 19, 2010
  12. Ten Reasons Chinese Companies Fail In The U.S.– Forbes.com: News , July 21, 2010
  13. App Inventor and the culture wars– OReilly Radar, July 15, 2010
  14. 10 Inspiring TED Talks for Startups– ReadWriteWeb, July 13, 2010
  15. Extispicium– Cognitive Edge, July 1, 2010
  16. Five Ways Pixar Makes Better Decisions– HarvardBusiness.org, July 15, 2010
  17. Yahoo! Media Chief Says Content Farms Won’t Kill Journalism As We Know It– Forbes.com: News , July 21, 2010
  18. In defense of games in the workplace– OReilly Radar, July 19, 2010
  19. You Got A Touchscreen, I Got A Touchscreen…– Lockergnome Blog Network, July 8, 2010
  20. Why Johnny Can’t Name His Colors– Scientific American, July 12, 2010
  21. How Knowledge Management Is Moving Away From the Repository as Goal– HarvardBusiness.org, July 9, 2010
  22. BookLiberator Lets You Make E-Books Cheaply (And Is Definitely Not Intended For Copyright Violation!)– Forbes.com: News , July 19, 2010
  23. Everything You Need To Know About The Fragmented Mobile Developer Ecosystem– TechCrunch, July 5, 2010
  24. Blog – ‘Activity Streams’ Will Be the Glue of Your Online Life– Technology Review Feed – Tech Review Top Stories, June 30, 2010
  25. Plants cannot ‘think and remember,’ but there’s nothing stupid about them: They’re shockingly sophisticated– Scientific American, July 16, 2010
  26. Why Your Customers Don’t Want to Talk to You– HarvardBusiness.org, July 28, 2010
  27. Researchers Show How Twitter, Twitpic Make Stalking Simple– Forbes.com: News , July 19, 2010
  28. Web 2.0 risks and rewards for federal agencies– OReilly Radar, July 23, 2010
  29. Wikis and Learning – 60 Resources– eLearning Technology, July 13, 2010
  30. Later School Start Time Leads To Better Students– Scientific American, July 5, 2010
  31. The illusion of progress lights a fire– Mind Hacks, July 20, 2010
  32. your rapid prototyping tool for ipad: keynote– Adaptive Path, July 15, 2010
  33. How to support informal learning– Informal Learning, July 12, 2010
  34. Having Reasons– Half an Hour, July 6, 2010
  35. Modern scholarship is a race against its own obsolescence– Abject Learning, July 19, 2010
  36. R-Buttons and the Open Marketplace– Doc Searls Weblog, July 19, 2010
  37. [2b2k] Long-form and web-form arguments– Joho the Blog, July 18, 2010
  38. – stevenberlinjohnson.com, July 21, 2010
  39. Infographic: Our App-Happy World– Fast Company, July 20, 2010
  40. Top 10 USB Thumb Drive Tricks [Lifehacker Top 10]– Lifehacker, July 10, 2010
  41. Building an Audio Collection for All the World’s Languages– The Long Now Blog, July 21, 2010
  42. Robot teachers – endlessly patient, CPD updates in seconds– Donald Clark Plan B, July 20, 2010
  43. Getting All A’s But Flunking Life – IQ Scores Climb As Creativity Sinks– Eide Neurolearning Blog, July 19, 2010
  44. The Evolving Nature of the Corporation– Irving Wladawsky-Berger, July 9, 2010
  45. The Social Media Cigarette Break– Learnlets, July 6, 2010
  46. No place for the young in the economy now – Food is the key– Robert Paterson’s Weblog, July 18, 2010
  47. Kill The Meeting– edublogs, July 28, 2010
  48. It’s all relative– Internet Time, July 17, 2010
  49. Amazing Story of Openness – 2010ED366 a story.– Dave’s Educational Blog, July 23, 2010
  50. EVER TRIED TO HIT A MOVING TARGET AT TWENTY PACES WITH A COLT 45?– Performance Learning Productivity, July 15, 2010
  51. Video: Secure Passwords – Explained By Common Craft– Common Craft – Explanations In Plain English –, July 7, 2010

Other Sources

The following are the top items based on social signals.

  1. Well Played, Blackboard, July 8, 2010
  2. An introduction to social media – for learning and performance enhancement, July 7, 2010
  3. Blackboard Takes eLearning to the Education Enterprise, July 12, 2010
  4. Role Shift, July 5, 2010

Hot Topics

Information (1067)

  1. How to support informal learning, July 12, 2010
  2. Outsource the Work, Not the Leadership, July 19, 2010
  3. Managing in Complexity, July 13, 2010
  4. Knowledge sharing, one at a time, July 21, 2010

customers (593)

  1. Why Your Customers Don’t Want to Talk to You, July 28, 2010
  2. How Call Centers Use Behavioral Economics to Sway Customers, July 13, 2010
  3. Four Lessons on Culture and Customer Service from Zappos Founder, Tony Hsieh, July 14, 2010
  4. Social Media’s Critical Path: Relevance to Resonance to Significance, July 19, 2010

Company (1468)

  1. Ten Reasons Chinese Companies Fail In The U.S., July 21, 2010
  2. How Reframers Unleash Innovation in Their Companies (And Beyond), July 13, 2010
  3. White House Tax Plans Favor Foreign Companies, July 21, 2010
  4. Companies Clutching Cash But Stingy With Jobs, July 1, 2010

partners (295)

  1. Product Management Software Company Atlassian Takes A Huge, $60 Million First Round Of Funding From Accel, July 14, 2010
  2. GE Partners With Big Silicon Valley VC Firms On Smart Grid, July 13, 2010
  3. EveryTrail Partners With Fodors And Others To Launch Interactive Travel Guides, July 23, 2010
  4. For Partners: The 12 Benefits and Risks of Windows Azure, July 12, 2010

Google (696)

  1. Google Secretly Invested $100+ Million In Zynga, Preparing To Launch Google Games, July 10, 2010
  2. Google vs. World: 79 Places Google is Being Sued or Blocked (Map), July 15, 2010
  3. Google Launches “App Inventor,” DIY App Creation Tool for Android, July 12, 2010
  4. Google Offers Mobile Payment with Chrome Checkout Extension, July 5, 2010

New Kodak better than Flipcam

I’ve been a tremendous fan of Flipcams, the $150 pocket-sized video cameras with an interface even a first grader can figure out. The one downside was sound. Audio is more important than picture when shooting video. Flipcams have no jack for an external microphone.

Charles Jennings showed me an awesome Kodak mini-cam that solves the problem. Check the specs of the $180 KODAK Zi8 Pocket Video Camera:

  • Capture HD quality 1080p video with 16:9 aspect ratio
  • Plenty of room for more—record up to 10 hours of HD video with the expandable SD/SDHC card slot that can hold up to 32 GB[1]
  • Make audio awesome—the external microphone jack lets you record in stereo
  • Get a new perspective—take amazing 5 MP 16:9 widescreen HD still pictures

File formats

1. video: H.264 (MOV), AAC LC
2. still: JPEG

Capture modes

1. 1080p (1920 × 1080, 30 fps)
2. 720p/60 fps (1280 × 720, 60 fps)
3. 720p (1280 × 720, 30 fps)
4. WVGA (848 × 480, 30 fps)
5. Still (5.3 MP, 16:9 widescreen, interpolated)

Anyone want to buy a couple of used Flipcams?

Conversation, not presentation

When Jane Hart and I shared our thoughts on social learning at the Irish Learning Showcase in Dublin last week, a formal presentation would have run counter to our message.

Instead, Jane and I had an informal conversation in the front of the room. In time, others joined in.

The format enabled us change direction based on our reading of the mood in the room. I intend to propose conversations in lieu of presentations whenever the opportunity presents itself.

It's all relative

CLO magazine

Published June 2010

When you talk to businesspeople, you must speak as they do. Executives only care about training as it relates to execution. Their interest is in moving the corporation forward. You should share that interest. That is what they pay you for.

A sponsor is the person who pays those bills. Sponsors are responsible for championing the case for change (i.e., the vision), visibly representing the change (i.e., walking the talk), and providing reassurance and confidence (i.e., the implementation plan).

Someone once interrupted me during a webinar when I was talking about how trainers need to be aware of corporate objectives and rate their contributions by their impact on the business. “Wouldn’t that require us to understand how the business worked?” he asked. Yes, of course. How could you do your job right without knowing how the corporation worked? Several others jumped in, essentially saying that organizational success and helping to meet strategic objectives was “not my job.”

The days when corporations were larded with layer upon layer of management whose job was to translate strategic imperatives from above into job descriptions and projects down below are long gone. Now all of us are supposed to sing from the same hymnal without the intermediaries.

    There’s no cookie-cutter formula for applying metrics, but there is an underlying process.

Measure results throughout your program, not just before and after. Keep your sponsor informed. Frequency is sometimes more important than quantity. Monitoring things early on may enable you to make mid-course corrections.

The Responsibilities You Share

Peter Drucker, hailed as the father of management, is a business guru’s guru. Drucker singled out eight characteristics of effective executives:

  • They asked, “What needs to be done?”
  • They asked, ‘‘What is right for the enterprise?”
  • They developed action plans.
  • They took responsibility for decisions.
  • They took responsibility for communicating.
  • They were focused on opportunities rather than problems.
  • They ran productive meetings.
  • They thought and said “we” rather than “I.”

The Metrics Cycle

There’s no cookie-cutter formula for applying metrics, but there is an underlying process.

Generally, you’ll follow these five steps to identify, agree upon, assess and use metrics. This is not rocket science. It’s the same process you already use to accomplish a lot of things in life.

Let’s briefly consider each step.

1. State the desired outcome. Results do not exist inside the training department. In fact, results do not exist within the business. Results come from outside the business. Imagine a no-nonsense businessperson, such as Jack Welch, GE’s former boss. If you can explain yourself to Jack, you’ve mastered this step.

2. Agree on how to measure. The only valid metrics for corporate learning are business metrics. Examples are increased sales, shorter time to market, fewer rejects and lower costs. How do you decide what measures to apply? You don’t. That’s the responsibility of your business sponsor, the person who signs the checks. Together you agree on what’s to be done and how you’ll measure success or failure. Once you’ve settled on the project and its metrics, get it in writing.

3. Execute projects. The projects could be training, an incentive bonus plan or more advertising. Training programs are often part of a larger scheme, and it’s fruitless to try to isolate them. In fact, savvy training directors look for major corporate initiatives they can hitch a ride on.

4. Assess the results. You must evaluate the impact of your efforts with the measures you set up back in the second step. In other words, you are not allowed to mimic Charlie Brown, who would shoot an arrow and then paint the target around it. Why stick with the measures you came up with before? Because that’s how you maintain credibility with your sponsor. You can bring up unforeseen outcomes or anecdotal evidence, so long as you follow up on those original methods first.

5. Begin anew. The only thing worse than learning from experience is not learning from experience. Your post-mortem on the completed project should include a section titled “What to do better next time.”<

Time is all we have


Effectiveness – Jay Cross
Published April 2008
Time Is All We Have

Networks arise when isolated entities link to one another. Improvements in communications technology (e.g., the invention of language, writing, printing, mass communication, computer networks) encourage connections. The denser its linkages, the shorter a network’s cycle time. Speed begets speed.

The connections that knit us together make us interdependent. Because other members of the network impact what you do, you lose even the illusion of control. The future becomes unpredictable.

Factory workers once were paid for what they produced. In a mechanized system, the slowest worker produced only slightly less than the fastest. If workers produced one widget an hour, paying by the hour was equivalent to paying by the widget. It also was simpler to measure. Managers became accustomed to equating time with production.

For the knowledge worker, time on the job often is unrelated to output. Google’s recruiters figure that an exemplary engineer can create 200 times more value than an average engineer. Only a fool would think it fair to pay each by the hour.

Visualize the workflow of a physical job: produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce, produce.

Now visualize the workflow of a creative knowledge worker: nothing, nothing, nothing, nothing, flash of brilliance, nothing, nothing, nothing.

That single moment of brilliance may be more valuable than years of production. The flash occurs in Internet time. A year of Internet time is roughly equivalent to seven years of calendar time. The term came into being because in its first year, Netscape was said to accomplish what had taken others at least seven years. (The firm has since imploded at an accelerated pace as well.) Internet time is a generalization, like a New York minute, the idea being that it’s faster than regular time.

A businessperson with a watch knows what time it is, but a businessperson with two watches does not. Most managers tell time with Industrial Age watches, acting as if Internet time does not exist and missing the prospects it offers.

Opportunities abound because the world now moves on ideas instead of things. Value has migrated from tangible assets you could see and touch to intangible assets such as ideas, relationships, patterns and reputation. Twenty-five years ago, intangible assets accounted for less than a third of the valuation of U.S. companies. Ten years later, more than 80 percent of that value was intangible.

In the world of intangibles, quality trumps quantity. You can build a relationship or develop an idea in a fraction of the time it took to build a factory. Furthermore, some efforts yield outsized rewards. As in nature, for every action, there may be an unequal and totally unexpected reaction. The butterfly that flaps its wings in the Amazon is perhaps the catalyst for Hurricane Katrina. An algorithm might give birth to the 17th most valuable company on the Fortune 500.

Chief learning officers consider themselves enlightened if they provide workers with a month of training per year. This would have been generous when the pace of business allowed for three-martini lunches and the nature of work rarely changed. Today, everyone is busy nearly every waking moment, they figure things out on their own, and they deal with increasingly complex situations. Routine tasks crowd out reflection and innovation.

Today’s managers have scenarios and possibilities, not single-track plans. This calls for new models. Some creative workers would produce more value were they required to dedicate 11 months of the year to learning and one month to innovation and decision making. Meta-learning and flexible infrastructure are becoming more important than individual topics. “Learning to be” will supplant “learning to know.”

At the dawn of the network age, managers enjoyed the luxury of annual planning. They communicated the firm’s goals to the training department, which in turn translated those goals into workshops, learning management systems and so forth. Back then, the past resembled the future closely enough that driving by the rearview mirror was feasible. Today’s rapid changes require very responsive driving skills. The road is being built a little of the way ahead, and it could take a turn we don’t expect.


Related: Internet Time’s page on Time

SpacedEd: simple, free, formal, worthwhile

In the beginning of the year, I decided to experiment with a simple learning technology developed at Harvard Medical School. Called SpacedEd, the free, cloud-based software doles out a couple of questions at a time every other day. Two minutes and you’re done. Great for basic drill.

I talked with Duncan Lennox, co-founder and CEO, who told me SpacedEd lived up to its motto, Online Learning Radically Simplified. Duncan and I swapped eLearning history stories; he’s not a newbie. The SpacedEd approach is predicated on a set of core principles:

    Short Repeated Bursts: Because it uses a regular schedule and an adaptive algorithm, learning can be delivered in small amounts that can take as little as 3 minutes a day.

    Push Learning: The learning comes to you on a regular schedule. You don’t have to remember to do it or set aside large chunks of time.

    Adaptive: The daily content adapts based on past performance automatically to drive long-term retention while requiring less time.

    Immediate Feedback: Once a question is answered, detailed educational feedback is provided. Users are also given performance data (their course progress and performance relative to peers) which feeds their addiction to the course.

I wrote 16 multiple-guess questions and invited readers of this blog to give it a whirl. To-date, 173 people have enrolled. 16 of these provided feedback, usually including a one- to five-star rating.

Normally, you wouldn’t expect me to give formal, push, multiple-choice methods a second look, but sometimes people have to master explicit facts. This is a relatively painless way to do that. I enrolled in a few other SpacedEd programs and rapidly picked up what I needed. (Granted, it was frustrating. You don’t have to be a designer to construct a SpacedEd course and sometimes it shows.)

As the course progressed, I changed and clarified questions based on participant feedback. Sometimes people learned more from the discussion than from the question itself. Here’s all the feedback to-date. I’ve removed names but everything else is intact.

Current rating: 07/16/10
For a Free course, this offers a glimpse not only into Learning, but into the strengths and weaknesses of the SpacedEd approach to learning. The value of the course comes more from the discussion than the specific questions and answers. Also, I think that the Feedback on the answers evolved and became more robust and useful with the course’s development. Given that the course is limited to 16 items, you shouldn’t expect to learn a whole lot about learning. But, what Jay accomplishes in those 16 questions is reasonable for this medium.

Current rating: 06/28/10
I love the delivery method. The questions are relevant to the career of Instructional Designer.

Current rating: 06/15/10
I think the author of this program ‘Learning about Learning’ is asking questions that reflect his own specialist knowledge/interest, rather that trying to enhance the understanding of those who engage with the program.

Current rating: 06/12/10

Current rating: 06/01/10

No star rating on 05/23/10
Zero stars. A self-indulgent melange of random factoids that began and ended in a wasteland of so what? I learned nothing worth learning about learning.

n 05/04/10
a few too many “who did what” questions – not bothered about who came up with an idea – moe interested in the idea itself. But an interesting intro to spaceded learning

Current rating: 04/04/10
I enjoyed this course and learned quite a few new insights. Some questions are asking for factual knowledge and a bit US-centric, but apart from that, I’ll recommend this course to anybody interested in learning about learning.

Current rating: 03/30/10

Current rating: 03/13/10
This course was an interesting first experience with this particular implementation of the SpacedEd concept. I am favorably impressed with the SpacedEd idea and believe that it has an exciting future, particularly in the emerging area of mobile learning (which some are now calling “mLearning”). Thanks to Jay Cross, the course author, for taking the time to develop the questions and monitor student responses and comments.

I still have questions about how practical and influential this form of learning can be. This course consisted of 16 questions which, while interesting, were not deep enough, individually or collectively, to generate any Ah-ha moments that will influence my professional practice or general learning behavior. My experience with SpacedEd so far suggests that it is an effective way to introduce and reinforce certain facts, but it is not yet clear to me that it has the power to impact students at a level that will alter their subsequent behavior.

To explore this further the two simplest paths, in view of the technology demonstrated on the SpacedEd website, are: 1) add more questions and/or 2) formulate questions that have a more explicit link to a deeper understanding of the subject or an improved practice. (Which of these would depend on the objectives of the course.)

Another idea that occurs to me, which may be possible with the current technology with some enhancements, would be to incorporate a more immersive student experience than simply answering multiple choice or true/false questions. If questions could be designed along the lines of simple case study simulations with the opportunity for multiple answers that lead to different outcomes and feedback to the student.

I’m still questioning how powerful this very simple Q and A model can be. I plan to try out some other courses and, possibly, develop a course of my own. Now that I’ve experienced one course as a student, it would be very interesting to “walk a mile” in the instructor/designer’s shoes to see the SpacedEd concept and this implementation from that vantage point.

Current rating: 03/11/10
What I like most about this course: The author is continuously improving the quality of the questions and answers, and is responsive to the ongoing (and often energetic) discussions.

Current rating: 03/07/10
Nice way of learning although the emphasis was more on actual facts (and a bit US-centric) and I expected a bit more Focus on activating questions that focused on real understanding of the subject. But Jay: thank you for offering this experience!

Current rating: on 02/22/10
ok!

Current rating: 01/31/10
An enjoyable course on some of the core aspects of learning with some excellent discussion by the author and participants.

Current rating: on 01/31/10
NLP is ‘snake oil’?: OK, where’s the research to prove that categoric assertion.

Time after time, I repeated what I’d stated in the introduction, that this was intended as an experiment to test SpacedEd, more than a learning experience. As you can see from the comments, many chose to overlook the technology and complain that the questions were not relevant or fair.

The criticism kept on coming despite my comments that sometimes you do have to know who did what just to establish your credentials. In the field of “learning about learning,” the topic at hand, wouldn’t you expect someone to be able to identify Gloria Gery, George Siemens, and the PLATO system? Geez. I’m not ready to lower my standards on these.

Making mistakes makes participants angry. My explanation that this is when they will learn the most didn’t go over well with some participants. (Like those who want to critique the questions or the questioner instead of the methodology.)

The Learning About Learning course is still open at SpacedEd. If you take it, pay attention to the dialogue, not the multiple choice items. I spent less than an hour coming up with the initial questions; they are not that deep.

My bottom line is that SpacedEd is cool for conveying explicit information that can be boiled down to a limited number of options. It’s simple. It’s useful. It’s free. I will suggest my clients experiment with it.

Too simple? Take some of the SpacedEd courses for med students!