Category Archives: Meta-Learning

Isn’t this how organizational learning cultures progress?

Jane Hart’s post yesterday on The differences between learning in an e-business and learning in a social business got me thinking about the evolution of learning culture in organizations.

It’s all to0 easy to mistakenly think of formal learning as the antiquated, primitive way of doing things, something an organization shucks off as it becomes enlightened and gives its people the autonomy to work on their own. The notion of stages suggests that a corporation hops from one stage to the next, abandoning past approaches as it advances.

What really happens is that one innovation is built on top of what’s gone before. Just as bicycles did not eliminate walking and cars did not do away with automobiles, informal learning doesn’t snuff out formal learning. That’s why models like 80/20 and 70:20:10 retain the 20 and the 10.

Think of it this way. Most organizations begin life with classroom learning and experiential learning:

As organizations mature, they take advantage of other methods of formal delivery, for example eLearning. Often this gives the worker more say-so about when to attend and sometimes whether to take part at all. They also improve the effectiveness of experiential learning by enlisting managers as coaches who give stretch assignments to develop their people and by developing practices that nurture self-directed learning.

Take a core sample of overall learning and you still find classroom training for newbies, compliance, and technical subjects. As the organization progresses, it adds more layers to the mix of learning going on. The newer approaches often diminish the importance of the lower layers but does not eliminate them.

Bear in mind that all learning is part informal/part formal and part social/part solo. These diagrams are conceptual, not derived from actual measurements.

The ultimate stage is the convergence of work and learning. As Jane points out, you don’t get this far just unless the organization has become a social business. Check her list of learning practices (the right column). Jane describes both the way people learn and the way the business functions; the two are inseparable.

Be careful not to confuse the progression of learning for the organization with the progression of learning for the individual:

Typically, the individual does phase out of most formal learning over time. Been there, done that, moving on.

Bonus question: Where would you place your organization in the progression to the convergence of work and learning?

 

 

How to Replace Top-down Training with Collaborative Learning (2)

Second post in a series. In case you missed it, here’s the first.

PEOPLE
Who’s going to be involved?
Every Kind of Employee – Temps Included

In the Hierarchical organization, employees were the only people who received corporate training. Aside from compliance training and new product introductions, most training focused on novices – either newhires who needed orientation or workers mastering a new skill or subject.

It’s not that seasoned and elder employees weren’t learning; we all learn all the time. Rather, they weren’t learning as well as they might. HR and training departments overlooked experienced employees because they learn experientially, from stretch assignments and mentors rather than from courses and workshops. Learning by experienced employees was left to chance.

Two out of three Chief Learning Officers neglect experienced employees, but these are the very people who make money for the company. New hires and novices aren’t very productive. Raise their proficiency by 20 percent and next to nothing hits the bottom line. Raising the proficiency of top performers by 20 percent can double the bottom line. A wise Collaborative organization focuses its efforts where they’ll have the most impact.

Pre-employees and alumni

Talent managers advocate pre-employment training and internships. As an example, they encourage college students with an interest in banking to participate in bank training and perhaps work at the bank during summer break to see if they enjoy it. The bank gains a leg up in recruiting and knows more about job candidates before making an offer. On the other hand, many former employees remain loyal to their firms, and sometimes even provide leads for new business. Andersen Consulting, IBM, and Goldman Sachs pay attention to so called “offboarding” as well as onboarding. They have set up social networks for alumni and help them keep up with new developments. Many alumni are future customers.

 

The Extended Enterprise

We need to start thinking of businesses as extended enterprises, especially when it comes to learning, because really, each business includes distributors, suppliers, temps, partners, contractors, and, importantly, customers as well, all in addition to employees.

Michael Porter’s concept of the value chain taught us that the values and costs generated by your suppliers and distributors are passed along to your customers. Since learning improves performance, it’s in your interest to help these people learn to do better work. Customers and prospects

“An educated customer is the best customer,” said retailer Sy Sims. Colearning with customers may be learning’s new frontier. Google is teaching people to use more of its services in online courses. Google could have produced a slick, buttoned-down, tech-oriented training program, like they did for Google Wave, but this time around, Google chose a friendly, avuncular fellow to lead you through the ondemand session. He’s not a salesperson; he’s a research scientist, a true-blue Googler! He gives encouragement: you’re on the path to being a Power Searcher! He’s casual, very approachable and looks like he’s talking to you from his living room. He stumbles occasionally. He comes across as authentic, the type of guy you’d enjoy talking to at a bar.

By doing this, Google is building customer loyalty. Co-learning builds trust. As other companies realize the potential of learning as a marketing tool, we’re going to see a lot more programs like this.

Help your customers become better at serving their own needs. Beyond that, learning with one another forges of trust and goodwill. Co-learning – adapting to the future – with customers is an unexploited marketing strategy.

Who should control learning?

People are at their best when they’re doing things for themselves, when they “pull” what they need rather than have things “pushed” on them.

Hierarchies work well when the future is predictable and things aren’t prone to change. The objective in a stable situation is to get better at what you’re currently doing. Organizations develop programs, training among them, that promote conformity.

Collaborative organizations outpace hierarchies when the future is unpredictable and change is rampant. The objective in a dynamic situation is to get better at whatever comes along. Wise organizations develop platforms with standard interfaces to maintain flexibility and spark innovation. These organizations give workers a say in what they learn and how they learn it. They provide a variety of means of for workers to get the information they need. Instead of rigid training sessions, the organization supplies a platform that nurtures self-directed learning.

Companies accomplish the transition from Hierarchy to Collaborative by handing over more control to those that are closest to the customer. This may seem radical, and change can be unsettling, but this is a key to becoming a Collaborative organization.

How self-directed learners learn

When given the choice most workers prefer to learn from experience. Experiential learning takes place in the course of trying to accomplish something, often by mimicking what other people do, by trial and error, and by asking colleagues and experts; this means experiential learning is often informal learning, done outside of the classroom. Mentors and coaches give assignments that provide new challenges and therefore require learning.

Conversation is the most important learning technology ever invented. People love to talk with each other. Conversations have magic to them. Look at a written transcript of a conversation and it sounds incoherent; true conversation is a mix of empathy, emotion, body language, shared understanding, nuance, and cultural norms. Conversations are the stem cells of learning. Improve the availability and quality of conversation, and you automatically improve the amount of learning taking place.

A survey last year asked managers how they learned their jobs. Informal chats with colleagues ranked #1, followed by Internet search, and trial and error. Workers value social learning (collaboration, networking, and conversations) and informal learning (community membership, Internet search, blogs, curated content, and self-study). Both social and informal are deemed more important by employees than company documents and training.

Jane Hart offers great advice on how to design a learning ecology to match the way contemporary workers learn. It’s no longer about delivering courses in training rooms.

Here are some tips from Jane on this subject.

• Think activities, not courses.
• Think learning space/places, not training rooms.
• Think lightweight design, not instructional design.
• Think continuous flow of activities, not just respond to need.
• Think social technologies, not training technologies.

Generations

Digital Natives are the generation that grew up glued to computer screens. For them, networks and technology are second nature. Stanford psychologist Phil Zimbardo says that by the time the average boy reaches the age of 21, he has spent at least 10,000 hours playing video games. This alternative reality rewires their brains. They’re accustomed to living in a highly stimulating environment where they are in control. Their world is made up of decision making, researching and collaborating all at the click of a button, anytime, anywhere, so they won’t put up with traditional training which says what they will learn and when. If Digital Natives aren’t allowed to act, they will refuse to play the game.

Digital Immigrants are those who grew up before interactive computing took hold. Some are in denial, trying to get by without going digital; they will become fossils. Elders who do want to join the Network Era have an opportunity to barter with the Digital Natives, something called reversementoring. Immigrants swap their organizational savvy and deep smarts for the Natives’ help in using technology.

The learnscape, that overall platform on which learning takes place, must accommodate both Natives and Immigrants. It must be easy to access and understand. It must let people take control of their learning and participate actively.

 

The next post in this series will address how to build an infrastructure to optimize collaborative learning.


White paper      |      Slideshare

The game of course

The largest obstacle holding L&D professionals back from taking advantage of network technologies, distributed networks, social connections, peer interaction, and informal learning may be their bedrock belief that learning = courses.

What’s a course? Where did courses come from?

The word course derives from twelfth-century French for running or moving forward. Over time, it morphed into meaning the circuit that was being run on, as in racecourse. In the fourteen century, academics started using the term to mean a planned series of study. Today, a course is a standard unit of measure of learning. Vendors sell training by the course. Students complete certain courses to earn a degree.

Courses are usually formal, in that the curriculum is defined by an outside authority. Courses are usually delivered in the same format regardless of the difficulty or breadth of the content, as for instance the 50-minute classes we endured in school and college. A cut-off score on a test supposedly verifies that the course’s lessons were learned.

Some people erroneously equate courses and learning. You need to learn something, you better take a course.

In point of fact, very little adult learning occurs in courses. People learn from experience, from solving problems, from asking questions, from mimicking others, and from trying various things until they hit upon the thing that works for them. Most adults studiously avoid taking courses. They resent them.

Few experienced people in business can dedicate a full hour to anything, particularly if they only want to learn two minutes of information embedded somewhere in the middle of a fifty-minute course. They have their own agendas; they have work to do. They lack the patience to wade through recitations of what they already know and lessons on things they don’t deem relevant to their work. They know what they want to know and that’s all they’re motivated to learn. It’s like walking into a discount superstore to buy a bag of licorice and finding the only size of licorice they sell is the three gallon 24-pack. It’s often easier to just go without.

In the past, I’ve sounded a wake-up call that most learning does not take place in courses. If that’s all we’re offering, we aren’t serving our internal customers. When this message fell on deaf ears, I wrote that courses are dead. I think I underplayed the message. Actually, courses are a ticking time bomb. If courses are the only way you enable experienced workers to learn what they need to know in order to excel, you’re not fulfilling your professional responsibilities. Tech-savvy hactivists are replacing the passive and obedient older workforce we’ve been accustomed to. Real soon now, you’ll be confronted with workers who are mad as hell and aren’t going to take it any more. If you don’t hack the system, they will.


Courses are boxes, and everyone but the new kids on the block believes it’s good to think outside of the box.

A major obstacle confronting L&D people participating in Internet Time Alliance workshops on social and informal learning is the difficulty of letting go of the course concept and the sense of control it gives designers, planners, and instructors. Harold and Jane explain that informal learning entails sharing control of learning with learners. Some participants can’t get their heads around this. They ask how we can be assured that people learn the right stuff, measure outcomes, and  certify completion.
At least half of the organizations we talk with are hamstrung by their slavish belief that courses = learning. (Never mind that you don’t measure what’s going on in courses, either).


Are you up for a challenge?

Join me next week for a simple game.

Set-up and rules:

First, load up on the spirit of social, informal, experiential, network-assisted learning by attending Harold and Jane’s workshops, listening to Clark or Charles’ presentations, reading our blogs and books, and/or drinking the Social Business zeitgeist from Fast Company, Andy McAfee, Working Smarter Daily, or McKinsey & Co.

Next, seat four to six people around a poker table or small conference table. At least half the players should be trainers, instructional designers, or HR professionals.

Players stack 4 quarters in front of their place at the table.

The dealer/convener opens a conversation about how workers or managers in their company could more effectively learn a particular skill. The conversation may ramble into talk of incentives and measurement, but players should guide it back to the theme of how employees can get better at that particular skill. The objective is to avoid the language of top-down courses and formal learning.

Players make suggestions one to three paragraphs in length, one after another, beginning with the player to the left of the dealer. It’s fair to build on one another’s ideas. The talking stick passes counter-clockwise at the end of each turn.

A player who says “COURSE” or “INSTRUCTOR” or “TEACHER” or “TEST” or “GRADES” puts a quarter in the pot for each occurrence.

Players with competitive natures usually wait until a person has said their three paragraphs, hoping they’ll blurt out several of the forbidden terms in one turn (which will cost them several quarters).

Play continues until only one person still has quarters; that person takes the pot.

Let’s see if you can prescribe a learning solution without resorting to the controlling world of courses.

Join me next week on Google+. I’ll deal. Up to ten of us can play. We’ll webcast the event.

Email me in advance at [email protected], subject: game. Google+, our gaming platform, works best when I invite participants in advance by email.

Time: 10 am Pacific time, Wednesday, August 15th. I’m +jaycross on Google+. If you haven’t used G+ yet, download the app in advance and set it up. This is not rocket science but you’ll miss the beginning of the game if you wait until the last minute. If you haven’t tried Google+, well, you should.

 


Bomb image by mcol, courtesy Open Clip Art Library

Generalities & specifics

The ‘Learning Knights’ of Bell Telephone in the Op/Ed section of today’s New York Time is a case study of Push learning vs Pull learning.

In 1955, Bell Telephone was concerned about leadership development:

“A well-trained man knows how to answer questions, they reasoned; an educated man knows what questions are worth asking.” Bell, then one of the largest industrial concerns in the country, needed more employees capable of guiding the company rather than simply following instructions or responding to obvious crises.

Bell set up a program called the Institute of Humanistic Studies for Executives. More than simply training its young executives to do a particular job, the institute would give them, in a 10-month immersion program on the Penn campus, what amounted to a complete liberal arts education.

Drawing by Dave Gray

The Institute was deemed a success overall but Bell was disappointed its graduates tipped the scale of work/life balance more to the “life” side:

One man [said] that before the program he had been “like a straw floating with the current down the stream” and added: “The stream was the Bell Telephone Company. I don’t think I will ever be that straw again.”

Over the following five years, Bell phased out the Institute of Humanistic Studies. Old ways die hard and once again, control preempted autonomy.

Today’s companies are grappling with the same issues Bell faced a half century ago. Are we confident our organization is preparing leaders who will be able to deal effectively with the challenges of the future?

  • Do we have the right balance of generalists and specialists?
  • Are we focused on the short-term or the long?
  • Should we teach what we know or inspire people to discover what we don’t know?
  • Isn’t the “soft stuff” as important or more so than the “hard stuff”?
  • Are our programs developing people we can trust to make the right decisions down the road?

I fear the training community is on the wrong side of these questions. The world is open-ended; it’s not assembled from black and white answers. Real life is painted in shades of gray.

You can’t measure discovery learning with an LMS but that doesn’t mean it’s unimportant. This does it mean you shouldn’t use an LMS to monitor compliance and formal learning either. In a healthy learning ecosystem, “Pull learning” and “Push learning” are symbiotic; you need a bit of both.

We need fewer drifting straws on the stream of American business, and more discontented thinkers who listen thoughtfully to both sides of our national debates.

Secrets of Working Smarter

Learning Solutions Magazine

Working Smarter: Informal Learning in the Cloud by Jay Cross and Friends

March 30, 2010

One of the things I like best about Twitter is the collegial, friendly fire-ish banter among L & D professionals. One of the most active of these professionals is the prolific Jay Cross. Jay, with his colleagues in the Internet Time Alliance, has recently produced the 2010 version of his “unbook,” Working Smarter: Informal Learning in the Cloud.

Convention and controversy

Among the topics often up for grabs lately are ideas around informal learning and the networked learning landscape of the 21st century. Those in the quantitative data/metrics/benchmarking camp argue against the legitimacy of the notion of “informal” learning. As often as not, they claim workplace learning is too important to be left up to happenstance, and requires planning and careful, thorough, design. Cross is clear, though, that he is drawing the “kill the courses, shut down the training department” line with a dramatically heavy hand, admitting that he uses it as much for shock value as anything else, while trying to put forth the idea of workplace learning as different from the traditional view of training course. He also asserts that “informal” does not, as it so often seems to be interpreted, mean “haphazard” or “random.”. Cross acknowledges the time and place of traditional training approaches, particularly for novices (although he questions the decision to put so many resources there rather than with supporting better producers). But seasoned workers, he rightly notes, will not flock to workshops and traditional classes, as they have work to do. Making it easier for them to get to information, to find one another, to learn through collaboration and by accessing meaningful self-service performance support, will strengthen the organization and “help sharp people become sharper.”

From the abstract to the specific

As I said on Twitter one night, “I am 93.2% suspicious of statistics about concepts of abstractions like ‘learning’.” While the data we have all seen – along the lines of “80% of workplace learning occurs outside the classroom” – may be appealing, and so quotable, we know we can’t actually measure anything like “learning” in these terms. But we do know that people learn at work all the time, every day, more from one another (even if that “other” is a person who has uploaded a video tutorial, or updated a Wikipedia page) than from anything that happens in a classroom. We know that peer groups and communities exist to share knowledge and support performance, even if they’re bootlegged and kept under management’s radar. We’ve all experienced a need-to-know moment, made better or worse by how quickly we could put our hands on the right information or find the right person to ask. Doubt me? For the rest of the week, as you go about enacting your work, ask how much of what you are doing came from anything resembling a traditional classroom or e-Learning course. Cross leads the reader on a tour of informal, networked learning and performance support, and helps move the conversation from 50,000 feet to 50. This “unbook” is a compilation of his own ideas as well as interjections from his colleagues in the Internet Time Alliance (Harold Jarche, Jane Hart, Charles Jennings, Clark Quinn, and Jon Husband), with chime-ins from many others. There are checklists, tools, and images, charts and provocative questions. And there are honest remarks about the state of learners, many of whom need to stop waiting for directions and start becoming self-directed. For me, the most value in the text comes not from the parsing out of the finer points of informal and formal approaches, but the articulation of the difference between training and learning. Food for thought, from Cross: “If you were to create the organization’s learning and development function from scratch, what would it look like? Are you still doing huge, expensive training-based software rollouts, or shifting the effort into on-point performance support? Have you taken charge of your organization’s learning function, or just training?”

The unbook

A word about the book itself – it claims it is not one. It’s an unbook, updated every year or so, and published by “Jay Cross and friends,” his colleagues in the Internet Time Alliance Group. Updates appear on Jay’s Internet Time blog http://www.internettime.com so, if they strike your fancy, purchase a bound or e-copy update from Jay’s site, from Lulu, or from Amazon. Where traditional books exist as editions updated every few years, often out of date before they even make it to bookshelves, this unbook is always in Beta. Be aware: While Working Smarter is organized into chapters, it is not the formal, tightly edited, unified work that some readers will expect from a traditional book. I found the organization refreshing, and the get-to-the-point-already style very effective. You can also find Jay on Twitter @jaycross, where he’s a frequent participant in the weekly Thursday night #lrnchat sessions that I help moderate. Join us! 8:30 to 10 PM ET. Jay Cross and Friends. (2010) Working Smarter: Informal Learning in the Cloud. Internet Time Alliance: LULU. $20 paper; $16 e-version, available from Lulu http://www.lulu.com/content/paperback-book/working-smarter-|-january-2010/8259651 or from Internet Time at http://internettime.pbworks.com/FrontPage.


For the remainder of this week, Working Smarter is available for $16 paper, $10 e-version.

Personal Knowledge Management

Teach a man to fish…

PKM: Figuring out what’s important to you, how to find it, how to keep up with it, how to make sense of it, how to recall it when you need it anew, and how to share it with others — this is ground zero for mining the riches of the web. Bookstore shelves overflow with books on blogging, but I’ve yet to see one on PKM.

Harold Jarche has written some great posts about PKM. But for those of you have a tough time seeing the trees for the forest, I decided to clean up my PKM framework and show you what I do rather than talk about it.

My links page is my launch pad. I’ve maintained a page like this for a dozen years. It may be my ADD; I need some semblance of structure. The launch page begins with frequent destinations. The little lobster signals my restaurant page; the plane, my travel numbers and suppliers. (These are screen shots; go to the links page if you want to play with the real thing. You’ll find some pages that are private.)

To the right of the clocks are a Google search of all my sites and an Amazon search box; I use these incessantly.

Mind you, I”m forever tweaking the launch page as my interests (and the web) change. Below the frequent destinations, I keep URLs of online services I tap into. To the right, blogs… although the list is a little flaky. I read a dozen blogs in the mail and many more in Google Reader.

To the right of that section are feeds I like and local organizations & events.

I use the bottom of the page to store frequently used graphics. No more searching all over for a common icon.

That’s the top layer of my Personal Knowledge Management set-up.

If you visit the links page, you’ll see subsidiary pages such as the Research page and my  Delicious tags.

I stash the social connections on my home page:

The home page is also the entry into my articles, groups, books, and so on:

One page I recommend visiting is this page of other people’s work. I plan to expand it soon.

Seminal Documents

How do you organize your PKM?

I set the foundations of my approach before we had tags, billions of choices, and responsive search engines. There’s bound to be an easier way.

Learning: traditional or independent?

This post continues the discussion among the members of the Internet Time Alliance about appropriate terminology for learning in the network era. This is an exploration, not an ultimatum.

The main point is getting the job done. That pays the bills. Everything flows from working smarter.

All learning is social, so that’s not really a useful distinction unless we’re stressing social networked learning.

Learning has replaced training as the term of choice. (For more on that issue, see transcript of tonight’s #lrnchat.)

There’s a continuum from top-down, mandated learning (“formal”) to self-directed, intrinsically-motivated learning (“informal”). Unfortunately, “formal” and “informal” are tainted words that invite misinterpretation. Formal can mean stodgy or accepted. Informal can mean casual or flippant.

I prefer calling the bookends of the spectrum of corporate learning….

  • Traditional learning — institutional control, paternalism
  • Independent learning — demand-driven choice by the learner

Traditional learning is not better than independent learning or vice-versa; context determines utility.

What are your thoughts about this?

Related posts

Understanding learning (Jane Hart)

Social media and self-directed learning (Harold Jarche)

Formalizing informal learning (Clark Quinn)

Interdependent Learning (Harold Jarche)

Informal Snake Oil (moi)

Come Together

clocover

Come Together, Right Now

Jay Cross

Organizations have woken up to the power of people working together. Collaboration gets things done and is the most powerful learning tool in the CLO’s playbook.

Twenty years ago, colleagues at far-flung enterprises communicated by phone, mail and fax. The world moved at a slower pace. FedEx slashed the time required to receive a document, but we were still stuck with a one-way medium. Expensive conferencing equipment enabled remote meetings if audio was all you needed. Proprietary videoconferencing packages transmitted video back and forth, but most people stopped watching the pictures once the novelty wore off.

Then, along came the Internet. Today’s organizations are learning the power of people working together in real time. The use of instant messaging migrated from high school to corporate life. Cheap, simple conferencing tools let workers meet wherever there’s an online connection. Presence-awareness systems route calls to people wherever they are now, not where they used to be. Expertise locators connect workers to people with answers; social software connects them with friends and colleagues. Online team rooms keep the lights on as projects move around the world, passed from one team to the next. Skype gives people the ability to place free video calls over the Net. Software such as Second Life allows executives — in avatar form — to give presentations to one another in virtual boardrooms.

The social learning revolution has only just begun. Corporations that understand the value of knowledge sharing, teamwork, informal learning and joint problem solving are investing heavily in collaboration technology and are reaping the early rewards.

The problem? Most corporate collaboration infrastructure is a haphazard collection of point solutions rather than what one would put together given the opportunity to start with a blank slate. And what’s wrong with that?

  • It wastes people’s time.
  • Unmanaged technologies introduce security risks.
  • Communications from one medium are often incompatible with another.
  • Each technology comes with its own logins and conventions.
  • Information is not captured for reuse or the building of peer-rated FAQs.
  • Maintenance becomes a nightmare for central staff.
  • Coordination breaks down. For example, bloggers may not communicate well with IM users.
  • Overlapping technologies are subject to breakdown.

This is not atypical when companies adopt new technologies. As people begin to rely on these solutions, however, they seek out a more solid, coordinated approach. Now’s the time.

Furthermore, far too many CLOs take no responsibility for the social media that makes collaboration work.

In recent surveys, Dr. Clark Quinn and I found that less than 40 percent of CLOs are involved in corporate decisions about communities of practice, social networks, content repositories, wikis and Internet access. Fewer still are involved with learning for customers, partners, distributors and the supply chain.

A quarter of the CLOs admitted that their corporate cultures do not value or encourage collaboration and teamwork. A similar proportion reported that their people did not learn new developments via in-house discussion forums.

At the Fall 2009 Chief Learning Officer Symposium, Rebecca Ray, senior vice president of global talent management and development for MasterCard, shared information from yet another survey. She revealed that 40 percent of CLOs do not tie metrics to business performance; 40 percent or less allocate their budget to support business initiatives; and 70 percent could not provide an example of a great CLO in action, driving performance.

Counterbalancing these tales of woe, Ted Hoff, vice president of the Center for Learning and Development at IBM, described his company’s dedication to work-based collaborative learning. The goal is to create constant teaching moments. Every participant in the career advisor program has at least one mentor. IBM is linking partners and clients into its collaborative infrastructure. Hoff has successfully shifted funding from formal learning to informal collaborative learning.

Still, 77 percent of the CLOs that Quinn and I surveyed said their people are not growing fast enough to keep up with the needs of the business. I fear that the picture for many CLOs is yet another example of corporate dyslexia: the inability to see the writing on the wall.

Virtual sessions at Online Educa

Guten Tag!

You are invited to attend several virtual sessions of Online Educa Berlin.

Thursday, December 3

Tools of the Trade, Jane Hart

16:30-17:30 Berlin
10:30 New York
15:30 London

Friday, December 4
Pecha Kucha
11:30 – 12:15 Berlin
5:30 New York
10:30 London
Future of Leadership Training

13:30 – 14:15 Berlin
7:30 New York
12:30 London
World Time: http://tinyurl.com/Berlin-130pm-Dec4

Future of Technical Training

14:15 – 15:00 Berlin
8:15 New York
13:15 London
Video Festival
15:00 – 16:00 Berlin
9:00 New York
14:00 London

Virtual venue: Adobe ConnectPro http://proj.emea.acrobat.com/simulcast Log in as “Guest.”

Link to descriptions of sessions.

LearnTrends: Backchannel

Clark Quinn and I led a discussion on Reinventing Organizational Learning at LearnTrends this morning. The recording will be up before the day is over, but I thought you might enjoy the discussion that went with it. Twitter and chat are ubiquitous at conferences now. The back channel becomes part of the overall message.

chat

Moderator (Jay Cross) to Clark Quinn: You have the baton now.

---------------------
tmast: yeah.  it looks like the sky in Indy too if you add big gray rain clouds, take away the sunlight, and change the blue to gray

---------------------
Mars Chen: ok

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: that work?

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: yay!

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: thanks harold

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: tmast: oh no! Sorry you are having yucky weather.

---------------------
Mary Myers: you could sing?

---------------------
Mitch Oliver: Just hum

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): no, no, not MUZAK!  Ahh...

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): and you do NOT want me to sing

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: do we want to start on time? it's 9AM

---------------------
tmast: Better rain then snow!  Although it's coming soon. ; - )

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/14067

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): hello all!

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Tmast: I don't do snow.

---------------------
Thomas Stone: Once attended a conf. session that had the theme from "Peanuts" (aka, Charlie Brown) while folks gathered for the session. Kinda nice actually.

---------------------
Mary Myers: you can never go wrong with the Peanuts theme

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: can I leave mic on?

---------------------
Mary Myers: you made a mistake?

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: lost audio

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: learnlets.com

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): learnlets.com

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: That's awesome! Love the title.

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): Clark is at http://blog.learnlets.com/

---------------------
@AgileBill4d:    did someone say Agile?

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Nope @Agile, said fragile

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): http://internettimealliance.com/

---------------------
Christy Tucker: You weren't working independently; you were working in parallel. You all had parallel conversations on your blogs etc.

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): parrallel but not coordinated, Christy

---------------------
Christy Tucker: true

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): traditional training & education has driven much of our self-direction and creativity out of us - need to relearn

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Nice! Love it Jay.

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): we're the people who've retained our love of learning despite our education

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): http://www.internettime.com/

---------------------
tabitha: i agree harold

---------------------
jadekaz: life long learning

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): slow learning, not event learning

---------------------
John McDermott: Antigua is a beautiful place.

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): or http://www.internettimealliance.com/

---------------------
Maryanne Burgos: stars

---------------------
kelly_smith01: gateway recession

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): world as biosphere, org as performance ecosystem

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): hierarchy: one person thinking for many

---------------------
mariancasey: social network

---------------------
kelly_smith01: change was yesterday

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: change will continue tomorrow

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): but things are moving too fast, networks where everyone is thinking towards the same goal) is where agility (yes, I said agile    ) can flourish

---------------------
Lucia: good

---------------------
kelly_smith01: OK

---------------------
Diane D'Amico: perfect

---------------------
Maryanne Burgos: Pace is fine

---------------------
Amy Graff: nice speed

---------------------
83yalow: perfect

---------------------
mariancasey: what do you do with outliers?

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @marian embrace outliers: diversity breeds better outcomes (if you  manage the process right)

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): btw, comments here welcome, questions encouraged

---------------------
kelly_smith01: Reminds me a bit of Rummler

---------------------
kelly_smith01: more and more partnerships in the future

---------------------
tmast: @Tony, could you please jot down the 90-9-1 rule?  Missed it in the conference segment

---------------------
Amy Graff: I teach students going into business (online). How can we conceptualize this in our classes?

---------------------
Chris 2: Agile networks require collaborative learning across companies

---------------------
Moderator (Tony Karrer): http://elearningtech.blogspot.com/2008/04/90-9-1-rule-aka-1-rule-in-collaborative.html

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @amy conceptualize the broader perspective re: learners, learning components?

---------------------
Amy Graff: @quinn - for the students I have, probably both aspects

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @chris, yes, if it's about the network, the network goes beyond org boundaries

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @amy: contributions to org will come from continual conversations, can't just bucket into formal, nor just within org

---------------------
Holly MacDonald: We need to talk about outcomes and business results within our orgs/with clients, not focus on "how" - that is stuff that we talk about with each other

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): though informal can work for new hires too: http://www.jarche.com/2009/03/informal-learning-works-for-new-hires/

---------------------
kelly_smith01: I recall Alison Rossett mentioning this in diff context years ago

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Leverage what is happening in the market. Thank you Apple with the iPhone!

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @kelly, yes Allison's rightly has been on Perf support for a long time

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Why is that?

---------------------
Cynan: yeah. that's a major problem here.

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Communities of practice belong to training

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: It is training!

---------------------
John McDermott: This is harkening back to Tony's comments re aggregation on his blog

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): no significant difference

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): the question is, leave KM to the propellor heads, or getting learning folks into the model

---------------------
Tammy P.: Plug for ASTD - CPLP Certification includes all of these areas of expertise

---------------------
Cynan: joint ownership? I think COPs belong to functional leads (eg CFO) but the social artistry of managing them, L&D should be able to advise on

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): CoP is NOT training, but 'training' (learning) folks have a role in making it work

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): @Tammy does certification = expertise?

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Get to caught up on terms and labels. KM, TM, etc. Lines are blurred, info is info

---------------------
Robin Haines: The criticality of learning across the extended enterprise has been an issue for many years. What is distracting CLO's from taking ownership of it?

---------------------
Chris 2: Pay it forward with knowledge

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @Tammy, I haven't seen that HPT-types have put social into their models, is it in CPLP?

---------------------
Tammy P.: It is discussed, but there are old ways of thinking

---------------------
Merilee: Command and control vs. collaborative?

---------------------
Wendy: I think trainers are in the excellent position to make CoP work because we naturally touch more corners of an organization

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): not much social in HPT - reason I moved away from it

---------------------
jadekaz: Addie tells us past. What do we do? Where do we start? With future

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): ADDIE cannot help develop emergent practices - they're in th efuture, not the past; no best practices to model

---------------------
DGlow: Asked the question yesterday- traditional design has ADDIE and other models. Is there an emerging model for social learning? A structure for folks to have some common language- can help with adoption.

---------------------
Asif: well said

---------------------
Janet: agreed about collaboration (and CoP's) require communities of Trust - not just fear of mistakes, fear of someone else getting an edge from you, while not sharing their knowledge

---------------------
kelly_smith01: wisdom of crowds

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): My first work on a new model: http://www.jarche.com/2009/03/informal-learning-works-for-new-hires/

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: DGlow: Don't know of any emerging models for social learning. Think ADDIE still applies, barebone methodology at least

---------------------
DGlow: Thank you Harold.  And Jenna- Yes, ADDIE does apply in some context, certainly.

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: DGlow: Or we can just come up with a new model, co auther a book, and be speakers for next year's Learn Trends

---------------------
jadekaz: Trust is easier in small spaces. Is that key? Starting small, ie., not company wide blogs

---------------------
Asif: trust is best in non-competitive spaces/cultures

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): make ADDIE participatory and add in Agile and you might have basis for new model

---------------------
Sandy E: In this context, I think ADDIE simply provides a way to organize and structure the things that we're exploring.

---------------------
Holly MacDonald: ADDIE works but many people don't do the A or the E

---------------------
dannymacc: Those are the most important parts of ADDIE

---------------------
Gillian: Or they think the A gets done after the contract is signed...

---------------------
kelly_smith01: They like to Avoid A and E each require justification or and proof

---------------------
Sara Jean Ward: amen!

---------------------
DGlow: Holly- Amen.  Sad, but unfortunately true.

---------------------
jadekaz: Exactly re: using new tools. Gotta play to win

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): ADDIE is also very content-centric and content is no longer th eissue - it's context & connections

---------------------
Sandy E: @Harold - I LIKE the idea of ADDIES becoming participatory (and avoiding the extended time that ADDIE seems to take)

---------------------
Snezana Nanevska: I have to analyze technologies used for learning purposes in organization? Do you have tips how to start the research? What are the technologies that shouldn’t be missed?

---------------------
Jeanne Farrington: Let's see... should we ignore the audience (part of the A in ADDIE)?

---------------------
Jeanne Farrington: Should we ignore the context? (also part of the A in ADDIE)

---------------------
Holly MacDonald: I think A also tells us about all the things on the slide

---------------------
Jeanne Farrington: How about design? Should we ignore that?

---------------------
kelly_smith01: Ignore E and ignore our faults/strengths

---------------------
kelly_smith01: ADDIE is a fixation - good idea

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): ADDIE is for mass instruction and it's as outdated as mass production

---------------------
Mike Rodgers: Does anyone currently use social networking as a form of training. We have the 20th century training but I think we need to move forward. Does anyone have examples of what they are doing?

---------------------
Sara Jean Ward: systematic approaches obsolete? hmmm

---------------------
kelly_smith01: accurate idea

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Absolutely Jay! ADDIE reminds me of project management, software development, product management...common pieces that have ubiqitious purpose

---------------------
Jeanne Farrington: You can do ADDIE on a napkin... is infinitely flexible

---------------------
Sara Jean Ward: @jeanne LOL

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): It's a different view on ADDIE: there IS formal in the overall performance ecosystem, but ADDIE only covers some.

---------------------
Holly MacDonald: ADDIE is a process, how it is applied can morph

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Yes @Holly. Well put

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): there'll be a role for design, context is critical

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): Waterfall software development was killed by Agile, and so ADDIE will have to go

---------------------
DGlow: Why ADDIE was adopted- the fixation was easy because it was apporachable.  If an approachable alternative is created for social learning

---------------------
Jeanne Farrington: Yes, @Holly

---------------------
Sandy E: @Jeanne - the problem is when ADDIE gets in the hands of a lot of IDs, it becomes monolithic

---------------------
kelly_smith01: ADDIE is a measure some use for evaluating job applicants - not a real tool

---------------------
jadekaz: Very high level. What is the ID to do?

---------------------
Tammy P.: Harold, You said it all.

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): @Tammy (ex-military & was immersed in ADDIE for many years)

---------------------
Jeanne Farrington: @Sandy E... then the problem is in the IDs. Doesn't make sense to blame ADDIE.

---------------------
kelly_smith01: military also used Merrill - in my experience

---------------------
Sandy E: @jeanne - true, but it doesn become an issue when the IDs are inflexible.

---------------------
mariancasey: Tie to organizational strategic objectives

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): first we shape our structures & then our structures shape us - need new structures IMO

---------------------
DGlow: Perfect Harold- my point. Folks need a structure to start and have successes without painful experimentation

---------------------
leslie lannan: RE: ADDIE - to paraphrase an artist friend of mine: "it's good to know the rules before you break them"

---------------------
kelly_smith01: Rummler processes instead of ADDIE = Rummler looks at the impact/role of performance to whole organization

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): no more info dissemination but move to "Connecting & Communicating"

---------------------
Jeanne Farrington: Cool, @leslie lannan

---------------------
Jon Folkestad: business owners usually know the business better than the LO

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): ROI *can* Lead you awry, focus on need to impact business success by facilitating performance

---------------------
Chellie: We're slowly changing from learning specialists to business change analysts in my corp.

---------------------
jadekaz: So, ID needs to expand to all of Gilbert's BEM

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: Could IDs be community advocates? What I hear right now is a lot about information services - becoming information experts in the organization and connecting employees to people and content to enable their work.

---------------------
mariancasey: Doesn't it require a team to accomplish this? IT, HR, Communications, legal

---------------------
kelly_smith01: Yes @jadekaz RE:Gilbert

---------------------
Asif: Kirkpatrick talks about 'ROE -- return on expectations'

---------------------
DGlow: Clark- correct.

---------------------
Sandy E: @ Christy - agreed - need to change behavior so people are accepting of that help, too!

---------------------
Holly MacDonald: focus on performance and outcomes

---------------------
mariancasey: How do break down silos unless you have a flat organization?

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): all internal departments are "artificial" boundaries - need to rethink roles in a networked environment

---------------------
Jon Folkestad: hasn't alignment been a problem for a long time?

---------------------
kfarentino: teachers are changing from instructors to facilitators - creating individualized paths based on student needs, including using a variety of tools from social networks to online lectures, to quick podcasts, to f2f conversations depending on the goal/outcome of the learning experience- business needs to do the same

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: We've tried to get at the table to be Information Consultants - maybe in the learning space there needs to be Learning Consultans or Learning Partners that sit at the table of major units or efforts in an organization to help faciliate and see the need for learning

---------------------
Frank Budimir: Move to Norway, Marian. We're all about flat organisations

---------------------
Bob MacKie: It's not a question of design tools. It is scope of practice. Learning encompasses areas outside the organizatio such as customers and suppliers.

---------------------
Sandy E: @kfarentino - University of Denver actaully creates "customized" masters programs based upon thpreferred outcomesof the student!

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): Intuit has outsourced ALL of its learning design & development to its customers

---------------------
mariancasey: Frank - Norway -too dark and too cold - thanks for invite though!

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: I see parallels to the the struggles of the information/knowledge services space here. A key is partnering and demonstrating your value to the business - then great things can happen - it does take time.

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): And Netflix is telling folks: here is where we're going, we're empowering you to make it so within these cultural imperatives, make it happen

---------------------
Gillian: As jobs become less 'for life', surely the indiviudal is assisting in breaking down the 'do unto' mode of course provision and actually fostering self-reliance and curiosity in learning - if only for personal economic survival

---------------------
mariancasey: How about building the collaboration or learning into the employees performance review - could that work?

---------------------
Maryanne Burgos: @Jenna Can you add me to the GW?  [email protected] TY

---------------------
Sandy E: @Christy - I the "time" factor is the time required to build trust and prove that you have something to contribute

---------------------
Frank Budimir: @Marian Can't win them all. But you're right and you're welcome

---------------------
Bob MacKie: There is also learning using community of practice outside the organization e.g. purchasing agents, chefs etc.

---------------------
John McDermott: Wave is public: just join in

---------------------
Judy Muller: Intuit..great idea to implement active practice of it's core "customer focus".

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: Sandy E - exactly! It's taken us a long time at Sun to develop the trust and relationships in the info space.

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Jay...we need to connect when you make your way to Orlando! I like you.

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: You tell it like it is. I respect that.

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: @maryanne: doing it now

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: I love that! Gosh, the power of the learning professional and the information professional is so obvious to me now in listening to everyone here.

---------------------
Holly MacDonald: internal consulting

---------------------
Jon Folkestad: why don't we imbed all learning facilitators in the business?  is there a need to have a centralized function?

---------------------
leslie lannan: @littleasklab trying to extend the nomenclature - from "learner" to "content user" - Who needs to know what, and classifiy content according to function and depth - external partners, customers, internals etc

---------------------
Mary Myers: interesting idea Jon..

---------------------
Christy Tucker: Jon, maybe "learning facilitator" is part of everyone's job

---------------------
Christy Tucker: not a separate role

---------------------
Sandy E: @Jon - would be nice to be embedded, with a CoP of learning professional to bounce around ideas

---------------------
Renee L Robbins: EXACTLY JAY!!

---------------------
jadekaz: One ID against the world is tough place to be re: changing from training to networking solutions

---------------------
Mary Myers: yes! @Jon and @sandy E

---------------------
Katina: great concept!

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: What would you suggest in place of performance reviews?

---------------------
tmast: Agreed JAy!

---------------------
stevenasstrom: NexGen learners are demanding immediate realtime feedback, annually is eons to them

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): we're already embedded in a CoP of learning professionals to bounce around ideas

---------------------
John McDermott: When I started in learning it was not a separate place in most organizatoins I worked with. Now it is an HR function in many places.

---------------------
mariancasey: But how do you enforce it then Jay

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Yes, but aren't job expectations just a part of it? Follow up gets done how?

---------------------
mariancasey: They are trying this at Aon

---------------------
Moderator (Jay Cross) to Jenna Papakalos: XOXOXO I'm available

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: @Jon - I think aligning learning or information experts to the business is key - it can still be a centralized function for efficiency and other reasons but then you have folks assigned to various efforts / groups / business units - then you are part of them and sitting at the table

---------------------
Bob MacKie: A sales representatives job is to teach, set prices, solve customer problems and develop trust relationships with customers. Should sales people be trained as trainers?

---------------------
Sandy E: @Jenna - used to have a manager ask me "what have you done for your company today?"  Seems to be an appropriate question in this space - what have you done to facilitate learning today?  Ends up being a cultural shift, I think.

---------------------
kfarentino: learning function needs to be directed by the learner. organizations need to support and foster that and to value it.

---------------------
leslie lannan: @littleasklab Linden Labs new HR platform for 3D and whuffie points has some big implications for performance reviews

---------------------
lauraoverton: Do you think that the squeeze on resources might open up new collaborations eg with those involved in internal comms  or marketing ?

---------------------
mariancasey: I think the focus is on the development of collaboration skills and promoting the collaboration by individual employees

---------------------
DGlow: Struggling with this heavily at my org currently. Not only performance review, but "peer review"- value of your participating in the network as a contributor- is there something to be done here? Seems heavy-handed.

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): jay's a stirrer

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: The Employee Communications group at Sun has this model. They are one central team but the bu funds the communicator for their group and that communicator is part of that bu's efforts - it's been really effective if you can make it happen.

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: Ha! I'll buy you a drink when you get here. Would love to pick your brain!

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): yes, and I've talked (and will be for MassISPI) about 'blow up the training department'

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): Article by Jay & I : http://is.gd/4Y82k

---------------------
Sandy E to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: Is it possible to print out or save the chat file after the session?  Really valuable things here!

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): (question, with a bomb, or like a balloon?

---------------------
kelly_smith01: @Bob MacKie sales persons could "train" everyone on customer needs (percieved) or the nature of cutomer business - they should know the outside environment

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @leslie, yes, one of the bennies of a digital environment is tracking behavior and having a record for dialog around performance (tho' requires a 'safe' culture for this)

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: @Sandy That is an outstanding point. You mind if I borrow that?

---------------------
Sandy E: @Jenna P - Absolutely, feel free!

---------------------
Jon Folkestad: @Christy I think you can matrix all of this and I also believe we should oursource this skill to all of our employees and build this competency.  This removes the LO as the bottleneck.

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @DGlow, 360 makes sense, IF used for employees benefit, e.g. make them more successful)

---------------------
HKoenen: if training can not demonstrate measurable results it should not be done

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: @Sandy Sweet! So generous.

---------------------
DGlow: The challenge with using some folks (i.e. Sales) for training- is that sometimes a resource that is $100/hr in value could be spending time on a much lower-level resource. In tough times, managers want them on line-of-sight value activities with immediate return.

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @SandyE: what have you done to facilitate organizational success!

---------------------
Jon Folkestad: Why do learning professionals always think that they are they only ones who understand how to analyze a problem and provide a perforamnce solution.  This is the meta learning we should be building.

---------------------
Chris 2: Sounds like definition of grace

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: Good question to ask Sandy - I love that too!

---------------------
DGlow: Well said Jon.

---------------------
Tammy P.: @DGlow I don't like that way of thinking. Isn't raising everyone to a better level going to add more value to the organization

---------------------
Sandy E: @Clark - created a series of webinars (no charge) for professional development.  Given that Sun is in flux right now - it's the best thing we can do for our employees.

---------------------
Charles Jennings: @hkeonen Agreed, but the measurables need to be business and org. results, not some type of 'learning results' - because most measurement of learning is flawed unless it's focused on business impact.

---------------------
DGlow: @Tammy- agree, but that's the pushback faced.  Esp. in times like now.  ST/Quarterly returns tradeoff for LT.

---------------------
kelly_smith01: The Future Arrived Yesterday: The Rise of the Protean Corporation and What It Means for You - Michael Malone

---------------------
kfarentino: "the sum of the parts" argument

---------------------
mariancasey: Optimize your talent and prepare them for external factors that change  rapidly

---------------------
DGlow: Completely agree with Quinn's Point.

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: I don't know a lot about the process in the learning space but a few years ago, our CLO, commended the library team for offering so many webinars on key information topics and questioned the learning team "why can a team of 5 people pull together these webinars so quickly and it takes us so long" - essentially we need to move faster to address learning needs

---------------------
Sandy E: @Christy - this is me applausing!

---------------------
Janet: short term is not all bad, as long as you are doing your st work with a view to the lt.  if you get some quick wins, you have the credibility to pitch lt soln's

---------------------
kfarentino: @christy we also need to value the contributions of the "field" workers in creating these types of learning objects

---------------------
leslie lannan: @littleasklab saw some SoMe metrics that said that use of SoMe decreases individual productivity, but the productivity of the group improves - which is where the work happens

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @Charles, yes, not learning skills, but collaboration skills?  If the net result is more ideas per person per time, or more solutions likewise...

---------------------
kelly_smith01: Limos

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: @Christy: Think we tend to overcomplicate things. I like to keep it simple. My mind can't handle complex stuff!

---------------------
Jeanne Farrington: Sadly, I have to go & get some actual work done. Has been fun listening & connecting.

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @Christy @jenna, yes, formal courses can't meet all our needs, need to move to 'least assistance principle'

---------------------
mariancasey: love Senge!

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: @Jenna ok, interesting to know - thanks!

---------------------
Christy Confetti Higgins: @kfarentino yes, totally agree to involve the field - it's all about connecting, building that relationship and trust with the organization and individuals

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): ie what's the smallest thing we can do to get them effective

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): how does this team get everyone working together optimally

---------------------
John McDermott: @Clark: I think this implies a just-in-time component

---------------------
Moderator (Clark Quinn): @john, yes, I reckon

---------------------
mariancasey: So what type of measurement is effective in measuring this type of learning?

---------------------
DGlow: Clark- AMEN!  Also, where you don't have to use a top-level resource (basic activities), don't take them off the floor. But, when folks need that resource, they have the foundation to have a good discussion.

---------------------
Judy Muller: Find ways to leverage existing healthy collaborations to benefit whole org learning!

---------------------
Tony Karrer WP to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, eLearnspace, George Siemens, Clark Quinn: Kim are the next slides loaded?

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): value network analysis

---------------------
DGlow: @Judy- great idea- start where it is happening well, and wrap it with more "captured" knowledge for all.  Brilliant!

---------------------
Sandy E: @Clark - smallest thing?  Make the light bulb go off - give them something that makes them say WOW.  People will pass that on and energize the others with whom they work - collaboration and sharing start.  I know it's not that easy, but I've seen it happen before, and it's pretty cool.

---------------------
Moderator (Harold Jarche): social network analysis

---------------------
Moderator (Jay Cross): Value network analysis: ABSOLUTELY

---------------------
mariancasey: Describe value network analysis  I've done social network

---------------------
Jenna Papakalos: A person wiser than me once said, "start with the end in mind. Everything else falls into place."

---------------------
Charles Jennings: socal network VALUE analysis....