Category Archives: The Learning Business

Jane Hart’s Top 100 Learning Tools

top100

It’s time once again to contribute to Jane Hart’s annual survey of tools for learning. I was the first person to take part in this project some nine years ago and now it’s an annual ritual. It’s enlightening to review what’s best in the toolbox.

My top tools for learning are:

  • Experience. Extracting the lessons of simply living my life.
  • Friends. My colleagues in Internet Time Alliance and colleagues.
  • Books. I have an extensive library and am in the midst of looking back through to refresh what I’ve learned from them.
  • Journals.  I buy a new black book at KaDeWe in Berlin every year to draw and write in.

These won’t be on my submission to Jane, because for purposes of the survey:

A learning tool is any software or online tool or service that you use either for your own personal or professional learning or for teaching or training.

      1. WordPress. My blog is where I reflect on things and share them with others. I’m still old-school on this, writing whatever I feel like. One reader complained, saying “I thought this was a blog about L&D.” Well, no, my blog covers whatever grabs my attention and that’s less and less about L&D.
      2. Twitter. I learn new things every day, following the links offered up by the 250 people I follow. I have 9,000 followers who provide feedback or answer my questions. (Jane has 26,000 followers.)
      3. Skype.  I like to see the person I’m talking with. Also, Skype’s great for talking with a group of people at once.
      4. Google. Many times I’ll be searching my own sites. I really enjoy using Google to search images. They are very useful when I’m trying to get different perspectives on a concept. If I need to remember who someone in a photograph is, Google will tell me about 80% of the time.
      5. YouTube. I tap YouTube for entertainment and publishing videos. YouTube also showed me what we wrong with my fridge and taught me how to create 300 dpi imagery with Photoshop,
      6. Flickr. Flickr enables me to enjoy memories of times past. Since 2001, I’ve posted 32,000 photographs.  I’ll admit to revisiting Monterey Car Week half a dozen times.20018082444_08f995c1e3_z
      7. Scoop.it. I curate five topics on Scoop.it (example). You really learn something when you share it with someone else. As master curator Robin Good suggests, you need to give your opinion to add value. It keeps you on your toes. Plus, searching for fresh content puts you in touch with the latest news.
      8. Diigo. Bookmarks are my external memory. In the course of researching two books, I’ve created nearly 3,000 bookmarks. (Here are the current bookmarks related to my book on DIY learning.) A side benefit is the ability to share your bookmarks with other.
      9. SurveyShare. I take surveys to find out where groups are at. One is currently collecting feedback from people who read my new book.
      10. The cloud. I store all my files online, in Dropbox, Google Docs, and iCloud. Since I work on three or four different computers, it’s great to have all my stuff available no matter where I’m signing in from.

Honorable mention:

VLC. This little freeware tool plays just about any video format you can throw at it.

iMovie. As movie editors go, this one’s simple as can be. It has its limitations, especially if you want to edit multiple tracks, but the output is excellent and it’s free on Macs.

PowerPoint. I’m not your conventional, bullet-pointed presenters. I use PPT for making simple diagram, for storing visuals, and keeping up with visual models. Every year I start a new PPT of general graphics.

neuronsPowerPoint image for Aha! book

Think for yourselves, plagiarists

informalIn 2006, Jossey-Bass published a book of mine on Informal Learning.

The book describes informal learning as “the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way people learn to do their jobs”

It compares formal learning to riding a bus and informal learning to riding a bicycle.

The book says that “Work = Learning; Learning = Work.”

Plagiarists
For the second time in a week, I came upon words I had written, unattributed, in an infographic and  a presentation on the web.

I put “unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu” and “informal learning bicycle bus” into Google and found those three words, verbatim but unattributed, in these works:

huffpostThis infographic on Informal Learning appears in Huffington Post.

ASTD InfoLine: Designing for Informal Learning by Bruno Neal, Linda Hainlen. “Informal Learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs….”

The most blatant rip-off is by Brainshark‘s Audrey Polce who uses my bus and bicycle analogy and wording without attribution in a webinar entitled Using Brainshark for Formal and Informal Learning. From her slides: bus:bike

Informal vs. Formal Learning: What’s the Difference? by Brendan Cournoyer, Director of  Content Marketing, Brainshark. Cournoyer thanks her for this knowledge in another post. “We can liken the difference between formal and informal learning to travelling on a bus vs riding a bike (thanks to Audrey Polce for this metaphor.”

Most of this next batch use the words “unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs.” Often that’s the only transgression, although to my way of thinking, that’s enough. When you quote someone word for word, you need to acknowledge your source.

Informal Learning Management, Evaluation, Regulation by Brian Swisher on the “eLearning Heroes” site. “I am writing a paper for my ISD Masters Program on informal learning. Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs.”

 How social  networks and Web 2.0 can support informal learning in your company or organization, EU Net Knowing Project,  funded by EU Leonardo da Vinci Programme in the framework of Lifelong Learning European Programme. “Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way people learn to do their jobs.”

Learning Networking through Mobile Apps, proposal defense by jepputeh iot. “Informal Learning: Unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way of us learn to do our jobs”

Informal Learning Context, EDU 09 – THEORETICAL BASE  OF  PHYSICAL SCIENCE EDUCATION – II by T.K Thankcom. “Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs. Informal learning is like riding a bicycle: the rider chooses the destination and the route.

Organizations and Cultures by dcarmona.”Informal learning is the unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way people learn to do their jobs.”

A Study: Informal Learning & Formal Learning in a General Music Classroom by Joon Hwang WONG Raffles Institution, Singapore. Presented at the 32nd World Conference of the International Society for Music Education. “informal learning takes place in an unofficial, unscheduled, impromptu way most people learn to do their jobs. ”

The words pop up on at least five term-paper writing services (although they may all be drawing on the same batch of papers) but I’m not about to pay a fee to read my own purloined words.

My take on this
I don’t promote Informal Learning for the money. Believe me, it’s not lucrative. I spread the gospel of informal learning because I’m convinced it works and it feels like the right thing to do. I’m a true believer, but I don’t like to feel that people, especially LMS vendors, are taking advantage of me.

A couple of weeks ago, I came upon an LMS vendor’s site that described his company’s way of doing things with several paragraphs lifted directly from one of my white papers. The CEO apologized profusely and we had a lovely conversation. The fellow who wrote the copy said “I used your blog structure as an idea however must have published the wrong version with your text rather than mine.” Uh huh.

This is hardly the first time. Three years ago I blogged Where to Draw the Line on Plagiarism? and gave several examples:

This morning I looked at a presentation on SlideShare by the head of learning of an Irish insurance company. Eight of the 33 slides were copied from a colleague’s presentation deck without attribution. Another slide credits me but gets the numbers wrong and attributes the idea to Time Magazine instead of Internet Time Group.

One slide re-labels Charles Jennings’ examples of 70:20:10 as 50:20:30 — I guess the presenter couldn’t believe that formal learning had such little impact. Another slide quotes a Nobel Laureate but fails to acknowledge that the quote was borrowed from Charles’ presentation. The Irish presentation had been rekeyed. Hint: keying someone’s material into your presentation doesn’t make it yours.

It gets worse. Clark Quinn and I found an entire white paper we’d co-authored on an international university’s site. It reappeared word for word — except for our names, which were nowhere to be found. It looked as if the university had written it. When we called them on it, their first defense was that they had found it on the web and couldn’t remember where. I demanded an apology; the university said it was not at fault. I gave them a choice: I would out them as brazen intellectual property thieves or they would take down the article immediately. They chose the latter.

Last month an LMS vendor borrowed 200 words from my site without attribution. They told me it was a mistake. The post now acknowledges *research authored and compiled by Jay Cross at: http://www.informl.com/where-did-the-80-come-from/

Marcia Conner once sent me a book, not a very good one, that printed 30 pages from my site without permission! These are not isolated instances.

I wrote a professor in New Zealand that “Your presentation presents words and graphics from three principals of of Internet Time Alliance (Charles Jennings, Jane Hart, and myself) without attribution and in violation of international copyright law.” He wrote back, “My sincerest apologies. I thought I had properly cited the work but it was not at all. Shame. I have removed the presentations. If you would like more recompense please let me know.” I told him “No need to remove the presentation. Just note sources for our material.”

I think I’ve been too much of a softie. I am fed up.

Future response
Maybe there’s an opportunity hidden here.

Henceforth, when I come upon plagiarism of more than a handful of words, I’m going to send the transgressor a link to this post and a bill for $1,000. If it’s a Fortune 50 company, it will be for $5,000.

If I don’t get a satisfactory response, I will out the company on Twitter and append the incident to this post.

plagiarism

Find out what’s going on beyond your borders

oeblogo

 

 

 

 

If you want to learn what’s going on in learning and development worldwide, join me in Berlin this December for Online Educa.

You’ll connect with colleagues from a hundred countries!

This is the 20th anniversary of this forum of thought leaders in business, education, and government.

Is it worth it? I certainly think so. This will be my tenth Educa.

 

 

#ITASHARE

Free-form responses on MOOCs+Business

Free-form responses. n=20, Business+MOOCS Survey 2/25-26/2103

moocltr

What is positive about MOOCs?

Remote access to material/course heretofore unavailable

2/26/2013 3:48 PMView Responses

I had access to professionally presented information that I otherwise would not.

2/26/2013 3:16 PMView Responses

Available anytime and free. Ability to move at own pace.

2/26/2013 7:36 AM

Access to content, arranged Continue reading

Update from Europe

Foreign environments exhilarate me. I just got back from Online Educa Berlin and a series of private conversations in Europe. Insights are overflowing my ability to record them and I’m having a ball.

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

Online Educa always leaves a special afterglow. Over the course of three days, I conversed with hundreds of colleagues from forty or fifty countries. I used to say that after conversation, the most important learning accelerant was beer. I’ve changed my mind. Riesling is a more effective learning lubricant.

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

This year’s highlight was the debate. Donald Clark and Jef Staes convinced an audience filled with academics that “banning schools and universities from awarding degrees and diplomas would improve both competence development and lifelong learning.” Read Donald’s take on the debate here. As recently as a year ago, this outcome would have been impossible.

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

The eloquent opening keynotes by Mark Milliron (Western Governors Univesity) and Sir Michael Barber (Pearson) undoubtedly softened up the debate audience. College and universities that fail to change face extinction.

So many friends, too little time.

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

Online Educa Berlin Online Educa Berlin

After Berlin, I flew to Frankfurt. At an outrageously tasty Italian restaurant, TULSER‘s Jos Arets and Vivian Heijnen and I brainstormed plans to help people be healthy, happy, and productive:

Frankfurt Frankfurt

Stay tuned.

Travel has its up and downs. The biggest downer was United Air Lines. I flew UAL back because I qualified for more legroom – “economy plus.” I don’t know how UAL stays in business.

United Air Lines United Air Lines

Pre-arrival lunch consisted of a bag of potato chips, an inedible cold cheese and turkey roll, a packet of mustard, and a small piece of candy.

“I can’t believe you serve this incredibly unhealthy food,” I told the cabinet attendant as I handed back my untouched meal.

“I can’t either,” she replied. “It’s worse when flying the other direction, and there’s nothing I can do about it. You have more power to fix this than I do, but you don’t have much power either.”

Unlike my Lufthansa flight to Europe, United charges for wine and beer. I paid $7 for a plastic bottle of mediocre red. Also, there’s no individual entertainment. Everyone watches the same movie. I told the cabin attendant I was going to cut my Gold Premier card in pieces and send it to UAL management. She wished me luck.

At the opposite extreme, the Hotel Spenerhaus in Frankfurt was a dream. I had a small but adequate room. Squeaky clean. Across from a church but they’d considerately provided ear plugs. Free Gummi bears on the pillow. Free peanuts on my desk in the afternoon. Fine free breakfast. Free newspaper. Free apples on the counter.

When I checked in, I asked about Wi-Fi. Free. “You are our guest,” said the manager. Recommendations for dinner? A great tapas bar two blocks away the first night. The Italian restaurant served the marvelous antipasti pictured above with lunch. (We returned that evening for pasta with fresh white truffles.) Two blocks from the cathedral. Three blocks from the Christmas market. Surrounded by art galleries and antique stores. Wunderbar.

The function of business is to delight the customer. Hotel Spenerhaus gets it. United Air Lines doesn’t. United says “United is the world’s leading airline and is focused on being the airline customers want to fly, the airline employees want to work for and the airline shareholders want to invest in.” Ha! I bet UAL doesn’t exist ten years from now.

 

 

#itateam

Hangout: Continuing Professional Education 2017-2022

Join me tomorrow, Friday, April 27, at 9:30 Pacific/12:30 Eastern in a Google+ Hangout to talk about the future of continuing education five to ten years out.

Let’s pretend we’ve just ridden our time machine to 2020. How will professionals keep up? Progress is zipping along faster than ever. The half-life of professional knowledge is measured in days. Most work that’s merely complicated has been automated; working means working with complexity. Software agents are doing our bidding. We’re connected to vast store of information in the cloud 24/7.

To stir the pot, consider these key trends in higher education from the 2011 Horizon Report:

  • The abundance of resources and relationships made easily accessible via the Internet is increasingly challenging us to revisit our roles as educators in sense-making, coaching, and credentialing.
  • People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want.
  • The world of work is increasingly collaborative, giving rise to reflection about the way student projects are structured.
  • The technologies we use are increasingly cloud-based, and our notions of IT support are decentralized.

These trends from the 2009 Horizon Report are still in play:

  • Increasing globalization continues to affect the way we work, collaborate, and communicate.
  • The notion of collective intelligence is redefining how we think about ambiguity and imprecision.
  • Experience with and affinity for games as learning tools is an increasingly universal characteristic among those entering higher education and the workforce.
  • Visualization tools are making information more meaningful and insights more intuitive.
  • As more than one billion phones are produced each year, mobile phones are benefiting from unprecedented innovation, driven by global competition.

Certification and compliance drive continuing education in IT, medicine, and other professions. How will those look in 2020?

Join the conversation tomorrow, Friday April 27, at 9:30 am Pacific on Google+. I’ll Tweet the URL @jaycross

[hrrr]

Image credit: http://hollywoodlostandfound.net/props/timemachine.html

Michael Allen describes the future of authoring systems


At DevLearn 09, Michael Allen gave us a peek at a new authoring system under development at Allen Interactions. (In case you didn’t know, Michael was chief architect of Authorware, the precursor to Macromedia and granddaddy of digital authoring systems.)

His latest project, code-named Zebra, is a powerful, drag-and-drop authoring environment. I’m impressed. I expect Zebra to own the market when it becomes available. I’ll let Michael tell you what he’s got:

Impact, a new journal on workplace eLearning

impact

The inaugural issue of Impact, the Journal of Applied Research in Workplace E-learning just appeared on the web. You can read this first issue on the web for free. (Disclosure: I am on Impact’s Editorial Board.)

I’ve read a little over half of the 14 articles. Richard Straub writes cogently about the lay of the eLearning land. Andrew Whitworth presents a fascinating thought piece on context. Stewart Hase explains heutagogy (a new term for me, I’m going to have to re-read this one.) Kay Strong and Holly Hutchins contribute a great overview of connectivism. The case study of eLearning at St George Bank is enlightening; I was intrigued because I’ve talked with these guys and know they’re thoughtful.

Two articles on literature searches puzzled me. The first found a paucity of information about the results of corporate eLearning. The second decried the lack of studies on eLearning in small/medium enterprise. Here’s the rub: both articles were looking in the wrong places. The first looks primarily at academic journals. Why not include CLO magazine and Training? Their readership is corporate; they relate case studies. Neither piece looks at information in the blogosphere. That’s where I find information on what’s happening; often it’s some place I’ve been directed to by Twitter.

Related:
Top 99 Workplace Learning Blogs
OED list of top 100 education blogs
Jay’s learning research page

LearnTrends: More Backchannel

Tony O’Driscoll delivered a fantastic at LearnTrends this morning. The recording will be up shortly but you may want to look at the back channel to see what you missed. The back channel is a step toward evolving a conversation between presenters and their audiences.

chat2
TONY ODriscoll: I AM HERE NOW ; )

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teresadeca: yes

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Moderator (Harold Jarche): yes, here you

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Mars Chen: yes

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Jon Folkestad: yep

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Wendy: yes

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Katina: yup

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Tony Karrer: here you

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83yalow: oui...yes

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Russ Clarke: We can hear you.

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Tony Karrer: can you promote me to moderator

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Moderator (Harold Jarche): you will need to upload - give me mic & I'll explain

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Moderator (Tony Karrer): [email protected]

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Moderator (Harold Jarche): [email protected]

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Moderator (eLearnspace): yes

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Moderator (Jay Cross): Guys make me a moderator, please

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John McDermott to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, kim caise: Tony: we have a new wave for today - more organized and less confusion.

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Moderator (eLearnspace): yes i will upload now

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Jenna Papakalos: Good morning! How are we today? Fabulous here in Orlando, FL!

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Moderator (TONY ODriscoll): COOL SOCIAL MEDIA IN ACTION

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Moderator (TONY ODriscoll): Thanks Jay ; )

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virginia yonkers: That's assuming you have twitter

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Paula Colwell: great idea!

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tabitha: just tweeted the link but happy to retweet

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Sara Jean Ward: i got here thru Ning today

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Kay Wood: I came in thru the Ning site. No problem.

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Diane Anderson: I just came in through the ning site. no problem

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tabitha: yeah thats how i got in

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Christy Tucker to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, kim caise: I got here through Ning: this page looks OK http://learntrends.ning.com/page/learntrends-2009

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Maryanne Burgos: me too

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Karen Bowden: I came in through Ning with no problem.

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Cynan: the agenda is back up

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Cynan: http://learntrends.ning.com/page/learntrends-2009

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Moderator (Harold Jarche): http://learntrends.ning.com/page/learntrends-2009

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DGlow: no prob with ning.

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Moderator (Tony Karrer): I just added it in

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Moderator (Tony Karrer): We are a well oiled machine

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Moderator (eLearnspace): apparently my computer did a windows update

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Moderator (TONY ODriscoll): With so many options via social media it is hard to stop presentation progress

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Moderator (eLearnspace): and i could not connect for awhile

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tabitha: hey i tweeted the link and got my first retweet! Sweeet.

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Jenna Papakalos: Good for you @tabitha! Nice.

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Moderator (George Siemens): audio is great

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Moderator (Tony Karrer): yes

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tabitha: yes

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Gillian: yes

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Will Thalheimer: yes

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Karen Bowden: yes

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83yalow: yes

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Diane Anderson: yes

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Diane D'Amico: yes

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Julie Spokus: Yes

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Jenna Papakalos: Good morning Tony! Looking forward to your presentation.

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Laura F.: a square?

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AlanW: white box

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Mitch Oliver: square

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Will Thalheimer: folder

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Christy Tucker: A quadrilateral

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tabitha: foder

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Paula Colwell: pat of butter

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jadekaz: square dot

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83yalow: button

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Karen Bowden: a folder

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Diane D'Amico: a box

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Cynan: kind of oblong

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Jenna Papakalos: box

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@AgileBill4d: PRIM!!!

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Asif: light at the end of a tunnel

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Sara Jean Ward: big pixel

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Dan: the abyss

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Gillian: off-cquare oblong of light

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GarethM: small screen

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Julie Spokus: A small window to the world

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tabitha: *folder

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virginia yonkers: A chip?

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Moderator (Jay Cross): A NODE

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John Zaums: primal shape

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Immernet Singularity: polygon

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Larry Irons: a train

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Rob C: my cubical

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John McDermott: file folder

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Kay Wood: rectangle

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Maryanne Burgos: Button to push

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Mitch Oliver: Black screen

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Russ Clarke: White

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Jenna Papakalos: a state

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Moderator (Jay Cross): Colorado

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Sara Jean Ward:

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Julie Spokus: South Dakota

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Russ Clarke: Wyoming

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Danny Ortegon: wyoming

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Will Thalheimer: a state

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Diane D'Amico: a state

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teresadeca: a state

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AlanW: wyoming

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Paula Colwell: some stat in mid westà

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Susan Lewis - Rustici Software: wyoming

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virginia yonkers: wymoing

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Dan: colorado

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Gillian: a state in US

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Laura F.: wyoming?

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DGlow: S. Dakota

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Maryanne Burgos: Wyoming

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Karen Bowden: wyoming

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Gail H: Wyoning

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Jon Folkestad: WY

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dannymacc: wyoming

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Cynan: flat

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Madhuri: m??????

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Moderator (George Siemens): heh

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@AgileBill4d: WY

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Cynan: flat and cold

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Kay Wood: Nebraska

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Cynan:

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Larry Gourley 1: Wyoming

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Moderator (George Siemens): there's a country underneath us?

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Paula Colwell: hahaha George - way to represent!

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Moderator (George Siemens):

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Madhuri: context is king

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virginia yonkers: Context will be more important since our fixed places are no longer fixed

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virginia yonkers: But content is king for most decision makers

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Larry Irons: looks like my elementary school

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virginia yonkers: Looks like my 5th grade teacher

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Jenna Papakalos: That is a smart 4 year old who can write a whole report.

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@AgileBill4d: We can all make notes at http://tr.im/welearn using Etherpad

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John McDermott: There is also a wave. Search for #learntrends

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Cynan: Interesting bill.

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Will Thalheimer: yes

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Laura F.: what's a school?

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Paula Colwell: no change!

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dannymacc: that's sad!

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Maryanne Burgos: Yes. Good one!

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Mitch Oliver: Yes - no change

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Amy Graff: lol

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Erika Robertson: nothing's changed

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GarethM: yes

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Karen Bowden: Sorry, I was fascinated by the etherpad! Missed the punchline.

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virginia yonkers: Too many students in a huge classroom and one teacher and if lucky a TA

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Will Thalheimer: Bars and restaurants probably would look the same too.

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Moderator (Tony Karrer): So why do they create classrooms in Second Life?

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virginia yonkers: Do classrooms look different in Second Life?

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Kay Wood: No classrooms in 2nd Life...please

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Moderator (Tony Karrer): Great!

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jadekaz: field trips in SL

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Jenna Papakalos: @virginia If you want them to.

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Karen Bowden: Prezi is cool alternative to ppt

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Dan: because we haven't fully understand the platform capabilities in the same way that we put radio shows on TV when that medium became available

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@AgileBill4d: OMGosh, LOL

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John McDermott: Good, Dan!

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Solveig: Whose is that quote again? THanks.

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Moderator (eLearnspace) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens: i just uploaded the no build PPT so you can use the second set of slides tony

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DGlow: Some folks can't let go of traditions- and Dan's point- it gives folks an anchor to move into a new medium.

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Kay Wood: Alvin Toffler

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virginia yonkers: So we don't really need technology for that. Rather a change in mind set

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Rob Robertson: @Tony I think there is value in is recognizable spaces when entering a world like SL for the 1st time...but after the initial experience I agree classrooms in SL do not make much sense

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Moderator (Tony Karrer) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens: Kim - do you have slides from all the presenters scheduled today?

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Moderator (Harold Jarche): http://www.alvintoffler.net/

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Dan: I should say that my point came from Marshall Mcluhan

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Kay Wood: Thx, Harold

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Moderator (eLearnspace) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens: yes i do

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Sara Jean Ward: huge paradigm shift!

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Moderator (eLearnspace) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens: tony needs to advance to the slide 6 on the second set

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Paula Colwell: @virginia - still great to have the technology but unless you have the change in mind set happens

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Paula Colwell: not worth much...

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Jenna Papakalos: Thanks to Renee and Jon Folkestad for taking such copius notes in Google Wave!

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Maryanne Burgos: Hoiw do you find the wave?

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Rob Robertson: @jenna is there a wave url for this session?

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virginia yonkers: My daughter's school is project based where many of the projects are in the field. The technology has HINDERED the learning process because of the firewalls and restrictions needed at the secondary ed level. It muddies the learning water

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mariancasey: can someone invite me to Google Wave?

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Sara Jean Ward: https://wave.google.com/wave/#restored:wave:googlewave.com!w%252B081oy2-vG

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Maryanne Burgos: ty

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Moderator (Harold Jarche): ABC Learning (anything but courses) for me!

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John McDermott: The wave is public

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Moderator (eLearnspace) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens: sorry, trying to give you the new set sent before the session

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mariancasey: I heard you need invite

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virginia yonkers: Starting at the same page is tough

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tabitha: need invite

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Jenna Papakalos: @mariancasey - Yes you need an invite to join the Wave

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Moderator (eLearnspace) to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens: email me at [email protected] and i will send you an invite

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Moderator (eLearnspace): email me at [email protected] and i will send you an invite

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Moderator (eLearnspace): i only have 8 left

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Jenna Papakalos: @Rob - yes, here is the Wave URL http://bit.ly/42mF9

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mariancasey to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens: Thanks I'll send you an email. M

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Rob Robertson: @jeanna & @Sara Thanks!

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Jenna Papakalos: @Rob: welcome!

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virginia yonkers: What about context transfer?

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Moderator (eLearnspace): how do you find the URL for waves?

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John McDermott: You can search for #learntrends with:public

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Jenna Papakalos: It's on Twitter too http://bit.ly/42mF9

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John McDermott: The search entry is in the top center window on wave

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virginia yonkers: What about support? psychological especially

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Sara Jean Ward: i found the URL for the wave posted on yesterday's (Day1) wave

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Jenna Papakalos: @mariancasey: Cool! Interesting marrying into a Greek family. Certainly messes people up when they see my last name.

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Moderator (George Siemens): agree....

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jadekaz: Great explanation

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Jenna Papakalos: I like that. Webvolution

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abhijitk: that's a nice graphic

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Sara Jean Ward: agree (yay WoW!)

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virginia yonkers: And within the co-create are "societies" and "cultures" and "communities"

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virginia yonkers: Not just content and processes, but meaning making and artifacts

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Cynan: who are you calling an oxymoron pal

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Robin Haines:

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Danny Ortegon: roaring silence

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tabitha: hah

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Cate Poole: Are these slides going to be available after the presentation?-I am unable to listen, but am watching.

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Cynan: er... yeah.. except for the desire for all these vendors to lock in users by locking in their content

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Cynan: maybe not all, but many

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@AgileBill4d: re flow - that is very Lean / Kanban like - cool

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vincentBerthelot: KM is dead don't try to reanime it with just the 2.0 behind. We have to innovate !

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virginia yonkers: But I think he's saying we should be able to find others with the content

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virginia yonkers: But then how will content makers make money?

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@AgileBill4d: as consultants, how do we charge for the 'microservices' we provide as part of a network?

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virginia yonkers: So do instructors

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John McDermott: @AgileBill4d, good question

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virginia yonkers: My school doesn't meet my needs so I will outside the firewall and give my students a basket of tools

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Cynan: you don't. do bands get paid for putting demo tracks on myspace? use free services to generate your paying ones

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tabitha: nice yonkers, need more teachers like you!

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jadekaz: bands get paid for putting music on thesixtyone and allowing people to listen free, but pay for downloads

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Jenna Papakalos: Let's take this conference as an example. Synchronous virtual collaboration using Elluminate (facilator to participants), Google Wave (partcipants to participants) and Ning for asynchronous ongoing learner driven interaction.

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virginia yonkers: There are many of us tabitha, it is just the organization doesn't know

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vincentBerthelot: Nice slides !

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jadekaz: great job at capturing concepts through imagery

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virginia yonkers: Information or expertise is the currency?

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Will Thalheimer: Wait. People still have the content in their heads, no?

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Jenna Papakalos: info is currency

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abhijitk: here comes everybody is a really cool

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teresadeca: fabulous! ty, tony!

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Will Thalheimer: People are NOT just the flow.

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vincentBerthelot: The information given by people, dialog ...IS the flow

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@AgileBill4d: could we peek at that last slide one more time please?

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Moderator (Tony Karrer): I didn't quite get the connection between web 2.0 and 3D environments - see like they are pretty separate right now

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jadekaz: So, what can we do about getting out of the box - when we're assigned a training module to create?

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Asif: difficult to imagine what this type of space would look like

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john_royer: how will this evolve to create a more accepted evironment for the majority of businesses?

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virginia yonkers: Where does the social rules and new culture come into this? And how do you overcome management fears in this?

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Maryanne Burgos: What is the advantage of using a 3D environment? What extra does it offer?

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Asif: & how it would be different from the classroom paradigm

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Jenna Papakalos: What are your thoughts on how we are interacting and learning during Learn Trends 2009?

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Moderator (Harold Jarche): the network routes around hierarchy and gets the job done

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Cynan: "its conversation that's the king, content is just something to talk about"

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Will Thalheimer: Okay, but if my learning methods are better for my network partners, they'll be better able to retrieve info when I need it.

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@AgileBill4d: notes at http://tr.im/welearn

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John McDermott: Asif, it is hard to take a physical class to a new site in seconds -- works in a VW

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Sara Jean Ward: @jenna - it gave me a millenial a headache yesterday but i love how it enhanced my learning

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John McDermott: Virtual field trips

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Danny Ortegon: Depth and breadth of Web 2.0 tools may grow too fast to channel effectively??

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Asif: wondering how the gatherings would be represented differently than in a 'classroom' paradigm

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Sara Jean Ward: charge for onboarding!

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jadekaz: situated constructivist learning?

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@AgileBill4d: re economics: good question!

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virginia yonkers: How do you grab the attention and motivate the learner to what YOU want them to learn or need them to learn?

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mariancasey to Harold Jarche, Jay Cross, Tony Karrer, TONY ODriscoll, eLearnspace, George Siemens: I'm at Northwestern and we're still using Blackboard to interact; while students are continuous online during class participating in other networks. How do you bring educational institutions around do this type of thinking?

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Clark Quinn: and how do we discover things from flows that we aren't watching that are relevant to us, the captured nuggets. Or, what's the role for the learning function here?

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lauraoverton: Will this happen overnight or do L&D have a role to play in facilitation and change?

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Sara Jean Ward: 90-9-1 rule makes it so tough to get Web 2.0 going

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Sara Jean Ward: too many lurkers

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@AgileBill4d: thanks!

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Darren Short: HRD functions are used to demonstrating value through student numbers, course numbers, basic evaluations, etc. How does this change the way we demonstrate our value to key decision makers in the company?

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virginia yonkers: Many of my students don't feel they have learned if they find it "fun". THEY equate learning with content.

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tabitha: Im new to elearning what is the 90-9-1 rule

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tabitha: oh

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tabitha: nevermind!

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virginia yonkers: How do you change the students/trainees mindsets?

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mariancasey: The Wikipedia phenomenon

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Moderator (Harold Jarche): lurking is contextual

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jadekaz: Those that are there partiipate. But 90% still don't use social. What is twitter is still a common question.

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mariancasey: Charlene Li identifies the new types of network participants.

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Jenna Papakalos: @Sara Jean: Too funny! Be glad if you can type fast.

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Cynan: come on be fair - I use twitter a lot, but its pretty weird to get your head around

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virginia yonkers: Key point...those that use twitter...

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Ray Deis: Participation Inequality http://www.useit.com/alertbox/participation_inequality.html

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Jon Folkestad: people lurked because they didn't know how to interact. Now that norms and parctices are being esablished people are adding more value

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virginia yonkers: What is participation though? are we still using an old model of back and forth?

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jadekaz: Corp culture or school culture would determine what the percentages are in participating.

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Christy Tucker: Legitimate peripheral participation still has a role

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Will Thalheimer: What models, besides my Situation-

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Asif: more participation means larger online populations, which doesn't necessarily indicate reductions in lurking

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jadekaz: @christyTucker - that's the theory I was trying to remember!

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Larry Gourley 1: Going back to Christy Confetti's presentation from yesterday, there will always be a need for people who can help filter, tag, and align the "firehose" of information with helping companies get things done on a project basis.

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Jenna Papakalos: Learning is learning. Content is content. Technology is just another way to deliver the learning, another access point. How you get to the content is irrevelant. What changes is how the content is designed for optimal learning impact.

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John McDermott: How do we get management buy-in to using VWs? How do we show value?

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Clark Quinn: @Jenna, it's not about the content, it's about the experience!

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virginia yonkers: That assumes they motivated to change rather than just give up and settle

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Will Thalheimer: What models, besides Situation-Based Learning Design, have surfaced to help us design these learning interventions/environments?

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Kay Wood: Good question, Will.

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jadekaz: connectivism

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Gillian: One of the major changes now is that the floor goes to (s)he who types fastest rather than (s)he who shouts loudest?

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Clark Quinn: @Will, I still like cognitive apprenticeship

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David Walkup: well said @jenna Papakalos

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Will Thalheimer: Jenna, it's not just getting at content. What we want is to get info into people's heads in a way that it will be triggered to be retrieved from memory when the "learner" needs it.

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Clark Quinn: that question was about mining, federated search

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Robin Haines: It's all too common for L&D to have a Transactional focus rather than a strategic partnership focus

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Moderator (George Siemens): @Jenna - I take a slightly differetn view - technology has affordances that change what is possible.

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Clark Quinn: e.g. like SD Zoo looking for biological metaphors

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Will Thalheimer: Thanks @Clark Quinn

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Frank Budimir: @Gillian which means that (s)he who needs time to reflect still gets overlooked, heh

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virginia yonkers: I think it is more intrenched in the US than it was 20 years ago (classroom)

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Kay Wood: I read somewhere, "technology is not the driver, but the enabler." Can't recall who said it originally.

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Gillian: @Frank:

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Moderator (George Siemens): @Kay - again, I think tech is more than an enabler. it transforms

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Clark Quinn: I know it sounds like old KM, but I still think there's a role

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virginia yonkers: Still a tension between individual and company goals

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Naomi Moneypenny - ManyWorlds.com: Search is often a failure of navigation design

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@AgileBill4d: "aggregate behaviour" = wisdom of crowds?

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virginia yonkers: I prefer to browse a bookstore than go through amazon

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jadekaz: Technology separates "search" in the enterprise. Have to go to many diff places.

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Clark Quinn: I buy the overall proposition, but I think there're roles for both learning facilitiation, and semantic engineering

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Kay Wood: George, it has transformed my learning experiences for sure, but for many who are terrified of this, I have to sell it as an 'enable' first. Then the transformation occurs, but often slowly.

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virginia yonkers: Browsing a book store I find things I might not have thought of

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Moderator (George Siemens): @Clark - complexity in learning is best addressed through social sensemaking networks...and technology sorted connections/content (i.e. semantic)

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Will Thalheimer: I have found in doing my work-learning audits of clients in big companies, that most informal information gathering is NOT technology-enabled, but rather geographically and socially contiguousness enabled. In other words, if someone knows they need to know, they ask someone in the next cube, they ask someone after a meeting, etc.

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Jenna Papakalos: @Clark Quinn: Agreed! Why proper instructional design is so important.

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Jenna Papakalos: @David Walkup: thanks!

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Moderator (George Siemens): @Kay - that's a fair point. I have an ongoing issue with the "it's not about the tech" view. It. is. all. about. the. tech.

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John McDermott: That is a valuable insight, WIll. Sort of a "mesh of knowledge" view.

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Clark Quinn: @George, agreed, facilitation above and below

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mariancasey: In my research with multinational corporations, many are using Everest Leadership simulation from Forio Solutions to develop soft skills.

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Kay Wood: Will, I agree, but with remote work teams, I have found that technology subs for the "question over the cube."

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virginia yonkers: Tech muddies the water and can either support or set up barriers to learning

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jadekaz: People work around the technology

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Will Thalheimer: My point is that we as learning/performance facilitators ought to help people learn from each other in non-technology ways too. Some management/leadership training/thinking gets at this, but not too much. You and I can do better I think.

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Jenna Papakalos: @Will Thalheimer: Definitely agree. Big propronant of proper design to deliver learning most effectively or just wasting everyone's time.

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Clark Quinn: @Will, yes, it's not just about tech environs, but social environs, physical environs, a coherent performance ecosystem

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Jenna Papakalos: @George Siemens: good point. i like that.

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John McDermott: @will. 100% agree

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Will Thalheimer: @Clark. Yes, I've been using the term ecosystem as well. It's what makes sense.

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virginia yonkers: So back to my question, how do you get the students on board?

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Kay Wood: Will, I agree completely. People to people...that social part is essential for healthy working relationships.

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mariancasey: You can't do any of this without a collaboration culture.

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John McDermott: @virginia: I think it is far more difficult to persuade management than learners. Add fun and content and learners will come

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Sara Jean Ward: ROFL

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jadekaz: culture just important as context

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virginia yonkers: Not my students and not those who I've just studied.

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jadekaz: culture and contxt = collaboration?

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Gillian: @Virginia - find the problem and use the tools that fix it. Learning is not quite incidental but it's less of a thump than dishing out a textbook.

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John McDermott: Hmmm, any insights why?

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virginia yonkers: This is not the currency for success in their minds

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virginia yonkers: If they are having fun, they must not be learning

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mariancasey: plus learner's prior knowledge

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Jenna Papakalos: @virginia: depends on the audience. all goes back to understanding what motivates ppl and how to deliver the message

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Kay Wood: Where I am culture currently trumps just about anything. Changes in culture most often are sllow.

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virginia yonkers: They have more important things to do with their time

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John McDermott: @Virginia: I see that with techies, too.

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mariancasey: Without culture on board, any initiative will fail.

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@AgileBill4d: re diversity training - makes a huge difference - after 26 years of IBM Diversity training, I was blow away by wearing one different avatar - much more powerful

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virginia yonkers: And marian, culture goes all the way to the front line workers

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jadekaz: change mgt portion of HPT model is important

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John McDermott: I think we need to get culture/management on board. We need to help people see value in learning

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vincentBerthelot: Agree with mariancasey

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mariancasey: Agreed. Multigenerational issues also at play here.

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Kay Wood: The idea of a outrageous avatar is bit beyond me. I can't understand what it is like to be a NFL player by dressing as one. I prefer a better looking me.

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Gillian: @Kay - is there a culture emerging as an exo-skeleton? I've met lots of places where the side conversations on FB/Twitter are far prerferable to the ones in work on the official platform.

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virginia yonkers: John, many see the value in "learning" they just don't see the "fun" stuff as learning

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Asif: what is being learned in the image we are looking at?

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tabitha: its question time

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tabitha: hence the question mark

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@AgileBill4d: (don't forget to grab a copy of our collaborative notes 11 of us took at http://tr.im/welearn) social learning in action! lol

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jadekaz: we are the machine - wesch

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John McDermott: Virginia, yes, I have seen that. I still think that is an anachronism from K-20 school we need to try to overcome

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Clark Quinn: @asif collaboratively building questions (and, presumably, answers)

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Asif: @tabitha -- for the user inside the environment

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Kay Wood: @Gillian, few are on the Twitter/FB banfdwagon. Our company reflects its primary client, the Federal government. The ecoskeleton has started to form, but there is great fear. Will our client like us this way?

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Asif: is there an added value to this environment?

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John McDermott: welearn etherpad is full.

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teresadeca: ty, tony and jay!

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Gillian: @Kay - understand that. Try the UK whre there are departments where the preferred medium of comms is internet, not even telephone. It will happen everywhere sometime...

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Mary Myers: Thanks Tony and Jay!

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Moderator (TONY ODriscoll): Thank You ALL!

---------------------
Moderator (Tony Karrer): thanks tony

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jadekaz: Thanks! Great job!

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Jenna Papakalos: Thanks Tony!

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Karen Bowden: Sorry, I have to go to another meeting.

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Moderator (George Siemens): Thanks Tony!

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Karen Bowden: TY

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Gillian: Thanks!

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Mitch Oliver: Thank you.

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Moderator (TONY ODriscoll): Appreciate you taking time to listen to my ramblings.

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Clark Quinn: Great stuff, Tony, as always

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Janet: Thanks!

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lauraoverton: thanks Tony

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Moderator (Jay Cross): Bravo!

On the road again

tripmap

Last month, immigration officials began hassling me because every square inch of my passport was filled up with stamps and visas. I mailed it to Washington to have extra visa pages inserted. Now I’m sweating bullets because I’m supposed to fly to London on Sunday and my passport is in transit and may not make it on time.

Public speaking, like writing, forces me to sharpen my thinking, and that, in turn, improves my coaching and workshop sessions with corporate clients. In London, I’ll be talking about how to evaluate informal social learning and learning infrastructure, things that are tougher to get your arms around than individual courses. In my keynote address in Faro, I plan to discuss post-industrial learning and new approaches to instructional design. The next week in Madrid, my workshop will focus on informal learning: what it is, how to take advantage of it, and who’s been doing a good job thus far.

People invariably ask for slides and recordings, so from now on I will be posting follow-up information on my primary website, jaycross.com

If you’re in London, Faro, Seville, or Madrid, ping me if you’d like to get together.


lsg_logo

Evaluating formal and informal learning
London. June 9, 2009

cab

IADIS International Conference  e-Learning 2009
International Association for Development of the Information Society
Faro, Portugal. June 17, 2009

cvalogo

Informal Learning en la Práctica: Cómo diseñar su Proyecto de Aprendizaje Informal
Madrid. June 23, 2009